Graphics Library >> Biodiversity

Tag: Biodiversity

Sheep and goats in the Caucasus ecoregion
Over the recent number of years, as the economy came to a standstill, individual farms have replaced collective farming and subsistence agriculture and livestock breeding (cattle, sheep and goat) have became common. Alon...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Cattle in the Caucasus ecoregion
Over the recent number of years, as the economy came to a standstill, individual farms have replaced collective farming and subsistence agriculture and livestock breeding (cattle, sheep and goat) have became common. Alon...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessmen...
11 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Ecoregions in Antarctica
Antarctica represents a very unique and special case on our planet. With the richness of the Southern Ocean, the coasts and the Southern islands have relatively high biodiversity and biomass in the form of numerous sea b...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Protected areas, Arctic and Antarctic
Protected areas are very important for conserving biodiversity. In these areas, human activities are managed to achieve specific conservation goals, for example, to protect a certain species or to conserve a representati...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Potential for cropland expansion
Current projections suggest that an additional 120 million ha – an area twice the size of France or one-third that of India – will be needed to support the traditional growth in food production by 2030, mainly in deve...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Food consumption – trends and projections
Increase in crop production has mainly been a function of increases in yield due to increased irrigation and fertilizer use. However, this may change in the future towards more reliance on cropland expansion, at the co...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected land use changes
A central component in preventing loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services, such as provisioning of water, from expanding agricultural production is to limit the trade-off between economic growth and biodiversity b...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Temperate forests
Temperate forests are active carbon sinks and deforestation in the temperate zone has largely stopped. Where demand for land and/or water allows, reforestation would enable carbon sequestration and could provide other be...
06 Nov 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Invasive species response to climate change - Hydrilla spp, current and 2080 habitat suitability
As climate change alters Arctic ecosystems and enables greater human activity, biological invasions are likely to increase in the Arctic. To some extent, Arctic terrestrial ecosystems may be predisposed to invasion becau...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Trends in vegetation biomass, Ellsmere Island 1995-2007
Data from many sources and at several scales suggest that recent climate change is already affecting terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Comparisons of historical and contemporary aerial photographs provide evidence that Arct...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Definition of the geographic areas covered in the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment
The Arctic Council study on trends in the polar ecosystems - the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA) focuses on the areas displayed in this map. The high- and low Arctic regions are defined from the bioclimatic zones in...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Disappearing lakes - Old Crow Basin, Canada (1951-2001)
The Arctic contains a variety of types of lakes but overall, it is thermokarst lakes and ponds that are the most abundant and productive aquatic ecosystems in the Arctic. They are found extensively in the lowland regions...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Permafrost loss in peatlands of northern Quebec, 1957-2003
Over recent years, the southern limit of permafrost in northern peatlands has retreated by 39 km on average and by as much as 200 km in some parts of the Canadian Arctic. Although regional warming by 1.32°C has accelerat...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Bovanenkovo gas field and impacts on reindeer herding (Yamal, Russia)
A false color Quickbird-2 satellite image of a portion of the Bovanenkovo Gas Field on the Yamal Peninsula in West Siberia. Image acquired 4 July 2004. The construction phase began in the late 1980s. From that period onw...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Protected Areas in the Arctic
Protected areas have long been viewed as a key element for maintaining and conserving Arctic biodiversity and the functioning landscapes upon which species depend. Arctic protected areas have been established in strategi...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Trends in lakes in the Arctic
The Arctic contains a variety of types of lakes but overall, it is thermokarst lakes and ponds that are the most abundant and productive aquatic ecosystems in the Arctic. They are found extensively in the lowland regions...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Wild rangifer population trends
Wild reindeer and caribou, Rangifer tarandus, are widely distributed around the circumpolar Arctic where they play a key role in the environment, culture, and economy of the region. One of the two major wild reindeer po...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Current marine shipping uses in the Arctic
Biological invasions are known from around the globe but are relatively less known or studied in the Arctic. This secondary migration of invasives complicates ecological interactions as naturally occurring species from a...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Trends in speakers of Arctic indigenous languages (1989-2006)
Language not only communicates, it defines culture, nature, history, humanity, and ancestry. The indigenous languages of the Arctic have been formed and shaped in close contact with their environment. They are a valuable...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
Previous | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 | Next