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Aquaculture in the Mediterranean and Black seas Aquaculture in the Mediterranean and Black seas
Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world, with about one-third of global fish consumption coming from farmed fish.More than half of aquaculture production in the Mediterranean comes from western European countries (58 %).
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Aquaculture production in the Mediterranean Aquaculture production in the Mediterranean
Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world, with about one-third of global fish consumption coming from framed fish. Although the Mediterranean region has a long history of fish farming, aquaculture and particularly mariculture have undergone a dramatic expansion since the 1990s. Decreasing wild fish stocks, combined with increasing consumer demand for fish, have spurred growth of the industry.
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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World fisheries and aquaculture production World fisheries and aquaculture production
Shows the amount, in million tonnes, of fish taken by capture and aquaculture fisheries, between the years 1950-1999. Also included is a diagram showing the percentage of the different types of aquaculture in 1998.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in fisheries and aquaculture production (2000-2005) Trends in fisheries and aquaculture production (2000-2005)
The world's marine fisheries have stagnated or slightly declined in the last decade, offset only by increases in aquaculture production. A major reason why the decline has not become more evident is likely because of advances in fishing efficiency, shift to previously discarded or avoided fish, and the fact that the fishing fleet is increasingly fishing in deeper waters
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global capture fisheries and aquaculture production, 1950-1999 Global capture fisheries and aquaculture production, 1950-1999
The global fisheries catch has levelled off, reflecting a growing decline in most major fishing areas. This graphic shows the amount of global aquaculture production and of global capture fishery catches in millions of tonnes per year for 1950 to 1999. The graphic also shows the amounts of global aquaculture production in marine water, freshwater and brackish water, in millions of tonnes, for 1998.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Extent of cultivated systems, 2000 Extent of cultivated systems, 2000
More land was converted to cropland in the 30 years after 1950 than in the 150 years between 1700 and 1850. Cultivated systems (areas where at least 30% of the landscape is in croplands,shifting cultivation, confined livestock production, or freshwater aquaculture) now cover one quarter of Earth’s terrestrial surface.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World capture fisheries and aquaculture production World capture fisheries and aquaculture production
Current projections for aquaculture suggest that previous growth is unlikely to be sustained in the future as a result of limits to the availability of wild marine fish for aquaculture feed (FAO, 2008). Small pelagic fish make up 37% of the total marine capture fisheries landings. Of this, 90% (or 27% of total landings) are processed into fishmeal and fish oil with the remaining 10% used directly for animal feed (Alder et al., 2008).
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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State of world fisheries and aquaculture State of world fisheries and aquaculture
Drawing on research and statistical data since 2000, experts at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver have shown that catches reported by China are largely overestimated, concealing a substantial decline in world catches since the middle of the 1980s.
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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Trends in capture fisheries and aquaculture Trends in capture fisheries and aquaculture
The levelling off of the global fisheries catch reflects a growing decline in most major fishing areas. Today, these fishing areas are producing lower yields than in the past, and it is unlikely that substantial increases will ever again be possible (FAO, 2000). Inland and marine aquaculture production grew by about 5% annually during the 1950s and 1960s, by about 8% per year during the 1970s and 1980s, and by some 10% per year during the 1990s ...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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