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Zambezi River Basin vegetation Zambezi River Basin vegetation
Land cover and land use have great impacts on water resources, as they affect how precipitation translates into runoff, infiltration, evaporation, and the quality of the water (Hirji et al. 2002). Almost 75 per cent of the land area in the basin is forest and bush. Cropped land with mostly rain-fed agriculture covers 13 per cent of the land area, and grassland covers about 8 per cent of the land area.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin average temperature Zambezi River Basin average temperature
The temperature across the river basin varies according to elevation and, to a much lesser extent, latitude. Mean monthly temperatures for the coldest month, July, vary from below 13°C for higher elevation areas in the south of the basin to 23°C for low elevation areas in the delta in Mozambique. The coolest area is the south-eastern part of the basin, part of which is in Zambia and the other part is in Zimbabwe. Ground frost occurs locally in s...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin Zambezi River Basin
The Zambezi River Basin is located between 8–20° S latitude and 16.5–36° E longitude in southern Africa (Chenje 2000). It drains an area of almost 1.4 million square kilometres, stretching across 8 of the 15 member states of the Southern African Development Community (SADC).
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin average rainfall Zambezi River Basin average rainfall
Average annual rainfall across the river basin varies from 500mm in the extreme south and southwest part of the basin to more than 1 400 mm in the Upper Zambezi and Kabompo sub-basins, in the north-eastern shores of Lake Malawi/Nyasa/Niassa in Tanzania, and in the southern border area between Malawi and Mozambique (Chenje 2000). Rainfall is greatest in the north, with an extensive area receiving over 1 000 mm, and declines towards the south, ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin hydropower facilities Zambezi River Basin hydropower facilities
The hydropower potential of the Zambezi River Basin is estimated at 20 000 megawatts (MW)of which about 5 000 MW has been developed (Tumbare 2004). More than half of this potential is in Mozambique, about one-quarter in Zambia and one-sixth in Zimbabwe (SADC and ZRA 2007). The Cahora Bassa, Kariba and Kafue Gorge dams provide the bulk of the basin’s hydropower, generating 2 075 MW, 1 470 MW and 990 MW of electricity, respectively (World Bank ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin share by country Zambezi River Basin share by country
The Zambezi River Basin has 13 sub-basins, most of which are transboundary. The largest portion of the basin lies in Zambia, with smaller segments in Angola, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Malawi in that order. Tanzania, Botswana and Namibia have less than three per cent of the basin each.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Africa major river basins Africa major river basins
There are 63 transboundary river basins in Africa, covering 64 per cent of the continent’s land area (UNEP 2010). The Zambezi basin is the fourth largest in Africa after the Congo, Nile and Niger River Basins (Mukosa and Mwiinga 2008).
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Tanzania, a hotspot for agrofuel investments Tanzania, a hotspot for agrofuel investments
12 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Africa, a global market for large-scale land acquisitions Africa, a global market for large-scale land acquisitions
By 2013, international large-scale land transactions amounting to 46 million hectares had been successfully transacted worldwide. Africa is the main target of these transactions: transactions accounting for 50 percent of the verified land deals have been reported in Africa. Ethiopia, Sudan, Madagascar, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Cameroon in particular, have been the primary focus of land acquisition.
12 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Land acquisition by agricultural use Land acquisition by agricultural use
12 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Ivory transaction index Ivory transaction index
Overall, using weight and transaction indices derived from the ETIS data, illegal ivory trade activity remained at or slightly above 1998 levels up to 2006. Subsequently, a gradual increase in illegal ivory trade activity commences, becoming progressively greater in each successive year, with a major surge in 2011. The frequency of illegal ivory trade transactions in 2011 was roughly three times greater than the level of illegal trade activity...
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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Percentage of elephants illegally killed in Africa Percentage of elephants illegally killed in Africa
Since 2010, the percentage of elephants being killed illegally at MIKE sites across Africa has been higher than their natural reproduction rate.
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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Trend in proportion of illegally killed elephants (PIKE) in Africa Trend in proportion of illegally killed elephants (PIKE) in Africa
The PIKE trend across Africa show a clear increase in the proportion of illegally killed elephants from 2006 and up to 2012.
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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Large scale ivory seizures Large scale ivory seizures
Large-scale ivory shipments originating from Africa have almost exclusively been seized in containers at major ports in Asia, where there is an established customs inspection systems. Shipments have mainly originated from not only Dar es Salaam or Mombasa, but also West Africa.
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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African elephant population by country African elephant population by country
The overall sub-regional distribution of the African elephant indicates that approximately half of the total elephant population is found in Southern Africa, while less than 30 per cent are found in Eastern Africa. West Africa is home to the smallest number of elephants, only two per cent of the total number of elephants on the continent. The remaining 20 per cent of African elephants are found in Central Africa, although elephant numbers from t...
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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African elephant range and population distribution African elephant range and population distribution
Elephant population distribution and approximate core ranges of elephants in Africa. Individuals and minor groups of elephants can be found outside these ranges.
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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African elephant range and population density African elephant range and population density
While poaching is an immediate and direct threat to the African elephant, range and habitat loss are the most significant longterm threat to the species’ survival. There is good reason to believe that the total elephant range in Africa has been in decline over the last two decades. In 1995, the total range area of the African elephant was estimated at 26 per cent of the continent’s total land cover (Said et al. 1995). However, the latest ...
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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African elephant population: a different count African elephant population: a different count
The latest estimates of the total number of African elephants range between 419,000 and 650,000. Overall data reliability at the continental level has declined as many important populations have not been surveyed for over ten years.
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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Estimates of illegally killed elephants in 2011 Estimates of illegally killed elephants in 2011
In 2011, approximately 7.4 per cent of the total elephant populations in African MIKE sites were killed illegally. This is a significant increase from 2010, when the average number of elephants killed was estimated to be 11,500. Healthy elephant populations have a natural annual growth rate of between 5 and 6 per cent (Dunham 2012), or a theoretical maximum of 7 per cent (Hanks 1973). Thus the 7.4 per cent estimated illegal off-take in 2011 i...
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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Percentage of illegally killed elephants per sub-region Percentage of illegally killed elephants per sub-region
Central Africa has shown worrying poaching trends for some time, and has consistently displayed the highest levels of poaching in any sub-region since MIKE monitoring began. In 2006, PIKE levels were at 0.5, meaning that about half the elephant carcasses encountered on patrol in MIKE sites were reported as illegally killed. In 2011, however, PIKE levels had risen to 0.9. This extremely high PIKE level exceeds any of poaching data is becoming appa...
28 Nov 2013 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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