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Map of Botswana Map of Botswana
Total Area of Country: 581 730 sq km Portion of Country within Zambezi Basin: 19 100 sq km (3.3 %) National Population in 2010: 1.8 million Portion of National Population within Zambezi Basin: 13 140 (0.73%) Botswana is a semi-arid landlocked country situated on the central plateau of southern Africa, and encompasses most of the Kgalagadi Desert. The country receives little rainfall, experiences frequent droughts, and imports most food and ...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas share of total land area in Botwana Protected areas share of total land area in Botwana
The Government of Botswana has designated a sizeable portion of land area for conservation since before 1990. The protected areas in Botswana total 104,988 sq km, which is 18 per cent of the total surface area of the country, a significant proportion when compared to most other countries in the Basin, except for Zambia and Tanzania.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Map of Angola Map of Angola
Total Area of Country: 1 246 700 sq km Portion of Country within Zambezi Basin: 256 500 sq km (20.5%) National Population in 2010: 17.8 million Portion of National Population within Zambezi Basin: 651 480 (03.66%) Although the Zambezi River rises in Zambia, part of its upper course is in northeastern Angola, which is the seventh largest country in Africa by area and has an Atlantic coastline of 1 650 km. The country has distinct and alterna...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Access to safe drinking water in Angola Access to safe drinking water in Angola
Large numbers of people were displaced during the war and moved to urban areas, living in overcrowded slums, where the infrastructure did not exist or could not cope with their influx. The sharp increase in access to safe drinking water by 2004 reflects the emergency assistance and humanitarian resources that flowed in following the peace agreement, but in some cases was not sustainable. Angola has witnessed improved access to sanitation in ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Change in the number of threatened species in Angola Change in the number of threatened species in Angola
This figure shows the change in numbers of threatened species, indicating that this spiked at 71 in 2003 following the end of the war when some areas became more accessible and counts resumed. The 2008 figure shows a reduction in the number of threatened species to 63.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Change in biodiversity for selected species in Angola Change in biodiversity for selected species in Angola
This figure shows the percentage changes in biodiversity of some species, illustrating the reduction in diversity of mammals and molluscs, while others are steady or increasing (eg, birds).
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas share total land area in Angola Protected areas share total land area in Angola
Another indicator of environmental sustainability is the proportion of terrestrial and marine areas protected. The extent of the protected land area in Angola has remained the same since 1990, but there is little data available on the protection of Angola’s marine resources. The Southern Africa Environment Outlook shows that Angola’s protected areas total 81 812 sq km, an extensive area when compared to many other countries, but just seven perce...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Carbon dioxide emissions in Angola Carbon dioxide emissions in Angola
Carbon emissions have not been a significant part of environmental monitoring in Angola as the potential is minimal when compared to industrialized countries, and estimated figures are still low, although increasing rapidly due to expansion in the exploitation and use of petroleum resources. This figure shows annual carbon emissions per capita.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Land area covered by forests in Angola Land area covered by forests in Angola
Angola is the most densely forested country in the Basin (FAO 2010), including tropical rainforests in the north. While some Basin states had deforestation rates as high as 2.2 per cent, Angola shows a rate of between 0.1 and 0.2 per cent, although this is estimated as many of the forested areas were inaccessible for a long period. There has been no forestry inventory in Angola since independence in 1975, but the Ministry of Agriculture estimat...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Freshwater availability per capita in Zambezi River Basin countries Freshwater availability per capita in Zambezi River Basin countries
The water flow in the Zambezi river is estimated at 3 600 cu m per second. This represents about 87 mm/year of equivalent rainfall and less than 10 per cent of the average rainfall in the basin (Shela 2000). The average annual rainfall in the basin is about 950 mm/year (Mitchell 2004), but is unevenly distributed across the basin. The southern and western parts of the basin receive less rainfall than the northern and eastern parts. The more den...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Urban Population in Zambezi River Basin States Urban Population in Zambezi River Basin States
Zambezi River Basin countries share similar settlement patterns characterized by both low and high densities. While the basin is largely rural, urbanization rates are high. In Botswana and Angola, urban population constitute more than 60 per cent (SADC and SARDC 2008), and is projected to exceed 80 per cent by 2050 (UNHABITAT 2010). At just more than 25 per cent (UN-HABITAT 2010), Malawi is the least urbanized country in the basin, and yet the mo...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Annual Mean Temperature Changes for Kariba Annual Mean Temperature Changes for Kariba
The Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC states that global greenhouse gas emissions due to human activities grew by 70 per cent between 1970 and 2004 (IPCC 2009). The emission of greenhouse gases in one region may result in a temperature rise, with associated effects, in another region. Thus the high rate of greenhouse gas emissions across the world is partly the cause of the temperature rise of at least 0.5°C in southern Africa over the past ce...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River runoff Zambezi River runoff
A major impact of the construction of the Kariba and Cahora Bassa dams from 1950–1970 was the reduction in the Zambezi River runoff. Before the dam construction, the Zambezi River was torrential with high flows during the wet season from November to March and relatively low flows in the dry season from April to October. On average, the river discharged 60 to 80 per cent of its mean annual flow during wet season. Since the dams were built, the w...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Population distribution in the Zambezi River Basin Population distribution in the Zambezi River Basin
Population distribution is uneven in the basin, with large areas uninhabited and reserved for wildlife. In 1998, the average population density in the basin was 24 people per sq km, and this increased to 28.75 people per sq km in 2005 before reaching 30.26 people per sq km in 2008 (Chenje 2000; SARDC and HBS 2010). There are disparities in population densities between countries in the basin, with Malawi being the most densely populated country. I...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Reported malaria cases in Zambia Reported malaria cases in Zambia
The health of millions of people in the Zambezi basin is under threat due to an increase in the occurrence and spread of water-borne, vector-borne and respiratory diseases resulting from climate change related events (Boko and others 2007 in SARDC and HBS 2010). As a result of rising temperatures, it is predicted that the malaria-carrying female Anopheles mosquito will spread to parts of the region where it has not been found before by 2100 and...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Popoulation density increasing, per capita land area shrinking in Zambezi River Basin Popoulation density increasing, per capita land area shrinking in Zambezi River Basin
The population of the Zambezi River Basin grew from 31.7 million in 1998 to 38.4 million in 2005, before reaching 40 million in 2008. It is projected that by 2025 the population will reach 51 million (Chenje 2000; SADC and ZRA 2007; SARDC and HBS 2010). Although sparsely populated, average population densities in the basin show a consistent shrinkage in per capita land availability, which is projected to decline to 2.56 hectares/ person in 2025 ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Forest cover in Zambezi basin countries Forest cover in Zambezi basin countries
Zambezi River Basin countries have been losing forests over the decades, and this loss continues unabated. Rates of forest loss per year in the last 20 years have been significant with Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Mozambique recording the highest losses of 403 350 hectares, 327 000 hectares and 217 800 hectares, respectively, while Malawi and Namibia recorded the smallest losses at 32 950 hectares and 73 600 hectares, respectively (FAO 2011). The main ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin flood areas Zambezi River Basin flood areas
Over the last two decades, the Zambezi River Basin has experienced extreme floods and droughts (SARDC and HBS 2010). Most of the flooding in the basin is associated with active cyclones that develop in the Indian Ocean. The IPCC predicted that tropical cyclones will become more intense, with higher peak wind speeds and heavier precipitation associated with increases in tropical sea surface temperature (IPCC 2009). Major floods were recorded in p...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Threatened Species in the Zambezi River Basin countries Threatened Species in the Zambezi River Basin countries
Despite the abundance of wildlife resources in the basin, there are pressures that threaten the existence of this resource. Species that have become extinct in the basin in recent times include the blue wildebeest in Malawi, the Tsetsebe in Mozambique, and the Kob in Tanzania (SADC and SARDC 2008). Others face a high risk of extinction, and the number of threatened species across the basin continues to rise. The White (Grass) rhinocerous, Black (...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin wetlands Zambezi River Basin wetlands
Wetlands cover a large area of the Zambezi River Basin. For example, in Zambia the Kafue Flats, Lukanga swamps, Barotse flood plains, Nyambomba swamps, Cuando, Busanga,Luangwa and Luena flats cover an area greater than 2.6 million hectares (SADC and ZRA 2007). These wetlands are used for fisheries, agriculture, wildlife management, and transportation services.  The variations in flooding in areas such as the Zambezi floodplains, East Caprivi ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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