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Protected areas share of total land area in Tanzania Protected areas share of total land area in Tanzania
Tanzania has the second highest proportion of national protected areas among the Basin states, after Zambia, with 28 per cent of the country set aside for national parks, conservation areas, game reserves, and controlled and protected areas. Tanzania has been working hard to meet world limits of 20 per cent protected coastal areas by 2012. Famous marine parks in Tanzania include Mafia Island Marine Park and Mnazi Bay Conservation Area.
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Existing and potential hydropower projects on the Zambezi River Existing and potential hydropower projects on the Zambezi River
Proposed Dams and Hydropower Projects Water has many critical roles in the realization of socio-economic development in southern Africa. One such role is to provide hydropower to help the region to meet its ever-growing demand for energy. SADC Member States, through the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP), have thus planned to commission a number of hydropower projects in the Zambezi River Basin. The Basin is considered to have enormous capacity ...
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zimbabwe Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe has the lowest proportional slum population among the Zambezi Basin states at just 3.4 per cent, down from 4 per cent in 1990. The portion of national population living in urban areas was 36.4 per cent in 2006, about four million people, with a projected urban annual growth rate of 2.8 per cent to 2015.
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zambia Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Zambia
Africa is the fastest urbanizing region in the world and Zambia was the third most highly urbanized country in southern Africa in 1990 after South Africa and Botswana (UN-HABITAT 2010). Zambia has continued to experience high levels of rural to urban migration, as citizens seek to benefit from urban-based employment opportunities and infrastructure, thus putting pressure on urban amenities and expanding unplanned settlements. Almost three-quarte...
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Tanzania Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions in Tanzania
The population living in unplanned peri-urban settlements has been decreasing as a proportion of total urban population, while the urban population has also been increasing. Therefore the numbers have been increasing while the proportion has gone down. Both impact on the extent of slum areas. About 70 per cent of urban residents in most cities in Tanzania live in unplanned settlements, slums or squatter areas. A special programme to upgrade t...
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions Proportion of urban dwellers living in slum conditions
One-third of the urban population of Namibia lives in slum conditions, a situation that has remained almost static since 1990, reducing by less than one per cent.
21 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Sanitation trends in Zimbabwe Sanitation trends in Zimbabwe
Progress in achieving water and sanitation targets is off track. Urban water and sanitation systems are in urgent need of renewal, and have faced serious problems that led to localized outbreaks of cholera and typhoid. The country has to raise safe water coverage in rural areas from 61 per cent to 85 per cent and to raise access to improved sanitation from 30.5 per cent to 71 per cent (Government of Zimbabwe 2010).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Access to safe water in rural and urban areas in Zimbabwe Access to safe water in rural and urban areas in Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe’s total annual renewable freshwater resources amount to 20 cubic km per year, and although the country experiences quality and dry season problems at present, continued pressure on the resource will lead to water stress by 2025 (Hirji et al. 2002). Poor infrastructure hampers access to water in most urban areas, and in the capital, Harare, and the second main city, Bulawayo, residents have gone without piped water for as long as two we...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Threatened species in Zimbabwe Threatened species in Zimbabwe
Through the intensified conservation programmes, including the Communal Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources (CAMPFIRE), the number of threatened species was reduced from 38 in 2000 to 32 in 2004. CAMPFIRE is a community-based natural resource management programme in which Rural District Councils, on behalf of communities on communal land, are granted the authority to market wildlife in their district to safari operators who then s...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Carbon dioxide emissions in Zimbabwe Carbon dioxide emissions in Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe has done well in phasing out ozone depleting substances, reaching the target five years ahead of the 2015 deadline set by the Montreal Protocol (Government of Zimbabwe 2010). The extent of carbon emissions is not a significant factor in environmental sustainability in Zimbabwe at present. The estimated figures are low, and continue to go down.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zimbabwe Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zimbabwe
An initial impact of land reform was deforestation as forests were cleared to accommodate larger numbers of farmers, but the impact is yet to be quantified. Figure 4.52 shows that the proportion of land area covered by forests dropped by eight per cent per decade in the period from 1990 to 2010, according to FAO estimates.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Wood production in Zimbabwe Wood production in Zimbabwe
Between 2000 and 2005, Zimbabwe had the sixth highest rate of deforestation in Africa, averaging 3 130 sq km per year (FAO 2005), with increasing uncontrolled bush and forest fires. Agriculture is responsible for an estimated 700 sq km (roughly one quarter) of this annual loss, while heavy dependence on wood for fuel and commercial logging account for the rest.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of population without access to improved sanitation in Zambia Proportion of population without access to improved sanitation in Zambia
The proportion of national population without sustainable access to an improved water source had dropped below 40 per cent by 2008 and is on course to meet the MDG target of 25.5 per cent by 2015. With respect to sanitation, however, the situation is getting worse, and the proportion of the population without access to good sanitation rose by more than 10 per cent from 26 per cent in 1991 to 36.1 per cent in 2006, far from the target of 13 per ce...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Access to safe water for the urban and rural population in Zambia Access to safe water for the urban and rural population in Zambia
Although Zambia has serious challenges of water pollution arising from contamination by sewage and toxic industrial chemicals in mining areas, the country continues to sustain the provision of improved water supply to urban areas, although access in rural areas remains below 50 per cent, as shown in the figure.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zambia Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Zambia
The proportion of land area covered by forests has dropped more than six per cent since 1990, leaving two-thirds of the land under forests as shown in this figure.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Fuelwood production in Zambia Fuelwood production in Zambia
The consumption of fuelwood is expected to increase by 35 per cent between 2000 and 2020 (FAO 2003) and had already reached a level of 8.8 million cu m per year by 2009 (Figure 4.44). Much of the fuelwood is converted to charcoal for use in urban households or rural industries. Eighty per cent of the population continues to use solid fuels, although this is down from 86 per cent in 1990 (Government of Zambia 2008). Alternative methods need to ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Access to sanitation facilities in Tanzania Access to sanitation facilities in Tanzania
Sewerage service coverage in urban centres increased from around four per cent in 1990, to six per cent in 2000 and 17 per cent in 2008. There has been a steady increase of coverage in improved sanitation facilities from 40.2 per cent in 2001, 50 per cent in 2006, to 55 per cent in 2007, as shown in Figure 4.42. Similar progress has been recorded in Zanzibar, with the proportion of population using an improved sanitation facility in urban areas r...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Population using improved water sources in Tanzania Population using improved water sources in Tanzania
The proportion of people in urban areas who use drinking water from improved sources has increased to 83 per cent in 2008, from 68 per cent in 1990 (Government of Tanzania 2008). While more than 80 per cent of people living in urban areas in Tanzania have access to clean drinking water, the figure drops to just over one-third in the rural areas, thus bringing down the national average to about half of the population with access to safe drinking ...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Threatened species in Tanzania Threatened species in Tanzania
Tanzania is a large country with vast biological diversity and high numbers of threatened species,well documented. According to IUCN (2008), Tanzania has 10 008 known species of higher plants including endemic and non-endemic, out of which 235 (2.9 per cent) are threatened. Of the 316 known mammal species 42 are threatened (excluding marine mammals). There are 229 known breeding bird species out of which 33 are threatened (excluding those that mi...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Tanzania Change in proportion of land area covered by forests in Tanzania
The proportion of land area covered by forests has dropped by 19 per cent since 1990 due to deforestation, leaving just over one-third of the land under forests as shown in this figure. Much of the fuelwood that is cut is converted to charcoal for use in urban households. Rural industries also use substantial amounts of fuelwood. Alternative methods need to be applied and indigenous knowledge systems should be incorporated into sustainable harv...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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