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Tag: Acidification

Global Ocean Acidification Global Ocean Acidification
As carbon concentrations in the atmosphere increase, so do concentrations in the ocean, with resultant acidification as a natural chemical process.
06 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Uptake of Carbon Dioxide from the Atmosphere Uptake of Carbon Dioxide from the Atmosphere
Arctic marine systems currently provide a substantial carbon sink but the continuation of this service depends critically on arctic climate change impacts on ice, freshwater inputs, and ocean acidification.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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BSR ecosystem area where acidification and eutrophication exceeds critical loads BSR ecosystem area where acidification and eutrophication exceeds critical loads
Graphics from the year 2000 Baltic 21 biannual indicator-based status report on sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region (Baltic 21 Series No 1/2000). This graphic shows BSR ecosystem area where acidification and eutrophication exceeds critical loads.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Cumulative impacts on the marine environment Cumulative impacts on the marine environment
Climate change may, through effects on ocean currents, elevated sea temperatures, coral bleaching, shifts in marine life, ocean acidification and much more severely exacerbate the combined actions of accelerating coastal development, coastal pollution and dead zones, invasive species, bottom trawling and over-harvest. These impacts will be the strongest in 10-15% of the Worlds oceans. These areas, however, are concurrent with the most productive ...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Distribution of coldwater and tropical coral reefs Distribution of coldwater and tropical coral reefs
Coral reefs are marine ridges or mounds, which have formed over millennia as a result of the deposition of calcium carbonate by living organisms, predominantly corals, but also a rich diversity of other organisms such as coralline algae and shellfish. The coldwater reefs are highly susceptible to deep-sea trawling and ocean acidification from climate change, which has its greatest impacts at high latitudes, while tropical reefs will become severe...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Acidification due to climate change - impacts for oceans and coral reefs Acidification due to climate change - impacts for oceans and coral reefs
As carbon concentrations in the atmosphere increase from land use changes and emissions from fossil fuels - so do concentrations in the ocean, with resultant acidification as a natural chemical process. The skeletons of coldwater coral reefs may dissolve, perhaps already within a few decades. The impacts will be greatest at high latitudes. This will have an impact on all marine organisms with calcerous shells and body parts, in addition to coral ...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Wetlands in the Baltic Sea drainage basin Wetlands in the Baltic Sea drainage basin
Percentage of wetlands out of total land area (by grid cell) for the Baltic Sea drainage basin. Wetlands acts as buffers in cases such as antropogenic nutrient releases (which leads to eutrophication) and acidification. The ratios have been estimated from various sources, and resembles the situation at approximately 1990.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Coldwater coral reefs, distribution Coldwater coral reefs, distribution
Scientists are just beginning to learn about the many species in the remote, deep waters of the polar oceans. Corals, for example, are not limited to the warm, shallow waters of the tropics. They also exist in many cold, deep waters all over the world, including Arctic and sub-Antarctic waters. Coral reefs are marine ridges or mounds, which have formed over millennia as a result of the deposition of calcium carbonate by living organisms, predomin...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Coldwater coral reefs, distribution Coldwater coral reefs, distribution
Scientists are just beginning to learn about the many species in the remote, deep waters of the polar oceans. Corals, for example, are not limited to the warm, shallow waters of the tropics. They also exist in many cold, deep waters all over the world, including Arctic and sub-Antarctic waters. Coral reefs are marine ridges or mounds, which have formed over millennia as a result of the deposition of calcium carbonate by living organisms, predomin...
21 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3