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Sub-Saharan Africa: Mineral resources and political instability Sub-Saharan Africa: Mineral resources and political instability
Africa, south of Sahara, is a region with plenty of valuable mineral resources - metals, oil and diamonds. Foreign investments lead the extraction and exploration in many of these places to supply the world markets. This region is also the site of several open conflicts, recent and trying peace and political instability. Foreign armed forces are present in military bases and peace keeping forces. Copyright Le Monde Diplomatique 2004.
02 Nov 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Le Monde Diplomatique
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Mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo Mining in the Democratic Republic of Congo
In the DCR, thousands people earn their living from digging with bare hands and simple shovels to extract ore. They live with the constant risk of exposure to toxic and radioactive substances. Moreover they run a high risk of being buried by a collapsing tunnel, security measures being almost non-existent.
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Number of people in the mining sector in selected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa Number of people in the mining sector in selected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa
There is 1.5 million small-scale miners estimated to work within whole SADC region. Main countries for small-scale mining activities are Tanzania miners and Zimbabwe, where more people are involved in the small-scale, rather than in the large- and medium-scale mining industry.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human vulnerability and food insecurity – rainfall and economy in Sub-Saharan Africa Human vulnerability and food insecurity – rainfall and economy in Sub-Saharan Africa
For Sub-Saharan Africa, patterns in economic growth follow precipitation patterns closely. As rainfall has decreased over the last 30 years, so has the financial development. Rainfed agriculture represents a major share of the economy of these countries, as well as for domestic food supply. Improved water resources management and a wider resource base are critical to the stability and security that is required for economic development.
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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