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The Mekong River - survival for millions The Mekong River - survival for millions
The Mekong River - survival for millions Following the course of the Mekong River helps to understand the human/river hydrological interdependence. From its source on the Tibetan Plateau it drops 5,000 metres and flows across six countries before reaching its delta. More than a third of the population of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam - some 60 million people - live in the Lower Mekong Basin, using the river for drinking water, food, ir...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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World population evolution World population evolution
Trois hypothèses pour l’évolution de la population mondiale : Selon le bureau de la population des Nations unies, la plus vraisemblable est l’hypothèse moyenne : pour les périodes 1995-2000 et 2045-2050, elle prend en compte d’une part, la réduction du nombre d’enfants par femme (de 2,82 à 2,15), et d’autre part, une amélioration de l’espérance de vie à la naissance (de 65 à 76 ans). Le taux d’accroissement naturel tomberait ainsi de ...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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The decline of cod in the North Atlantic The decline of cod in the North Atlantic
Graph of the decline of fish stock globally and a map of fish stock in Maritime Canada and the United States.
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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Dependency ratio in renewable water Dependency ratio in renewable water
The dependency ratio is a good indicator of where tension and conflict over water-sharing and use can occur. The map clearly depicts such areas including central Asia, the Middle East (especially Syria and Iraq), India and Pakistan, and surprisingly, low land countries such as the Netherlands.
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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A World of Salt A World of Salt
Global water type by percentage. Estimates of global water resources based on several different calculation methods have produced varied estimates. Shiklomanov in Gleick (1993) estimated that: - The total volume of water on earth is 1.4 billion km3. - The volume of freshwater resources is 35 million km3, or about 2.5% of the total volume. Of these, 24 million km3 or 68.9% is in the form of ice and permanent snow cover in mountainous regions, a...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Africa’s rivers and lake basins cross many borders Africa’s rivers and lake basins cross many borders
The below shows the locations of 13 major river basins in Africa.
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), 2007
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The contribution of climate change to declining water availability The contribution of climate change to declining water availability
The real concern for the future, in the context of changing patterns of rainfall, is the decrease of run-off water which may put at risk large areas of arable land. The map shows how seriously this issue must be taken, while the forecast indicates that some of the richest arable regions (Europe, United States, parts of Brazil, southern Africa) are threatened with a significant reduction of run-off water, resulting in a lack of water for rain-fed ...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique)
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Coastal populations and shoreline degradation Coastal populations and shoreline degradation
Unsurprisingly, the coastal areas with the greatest population densities are also those with the most shoreline degradation. The areas surrounding the Black Sea, the Mediterranean and southern Asia have the highest proportion of altered land, while the coastal zones of the Arctic, northeast Pacific, south Pacific, West and Central Africa, East Africa, the Red Sea/Gulf of Aden, and Kuwait have the highest proportions of least modified land. In o...
01 Oct 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Planet index 2007 for marine species population Planet index 2007 for marine species population
The Marine Species Population Index provides an assessment of the average changeover time in the populations of 217 species of marine mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The index represents the average value of six regional ocean indices. More pronounced declines are seen in the southern oceans, attributed to the fact that major losses and degradation of marine ecosystems in the industrialized world took place prior to 1970. Marine species are ...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Fish protein world consumption Fish protein world consumption
Consumption of proteins from fish in % of total consumption of animal protein.
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Coral reefs at risks Coral reefs at risks
There are two distinct regions in which coral reefs are primarily distributed: the Wider Caribbean (Atlantic Ocean) and the Indo-Pacific (from East Africa and the Red Sea to the Central Pacific Ocean). - The diversity of coral is far greater in the Indo-Pacific, particularly around Indonesia, the Philippines, and Papua New Guinea. Many other groups of marine fauna show similar patterns, with a much greater diversity in the Indo-Pacific region. ...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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The coming water scarcity in Africa The coming water scarcity in Africa
In a few years from now, almost all sub-Saharan countries will be below the level at which water supply is enough for all. Even worse, most of them will be in a state of water-stress or scarcity.
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), February 2006
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Biological oxygen demand - BOD: 1976-2008 Biological oxygen demand - BOD: 1976-2008
The availability of oxygen is one of the most important indicators of the condition of a water body, because dissolved oxygen, or DO, (the amount of oxygen dissolved in water) is necessary for most aquatic organisms, including fish and invertebrates. Some species have very defined lower limits of DO that they can tolerate. Increases in DO can indicate improvements in water quality, such as has occurred in many parts of the world in the last 30 ye...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Trends in capture fisheries and aquaculture Trends in capture fisheries and aquaculture
The levelling off of the global fisheries catch reflects a growing decline in most major fishing areas. Today, these fishing areas are producing lower yields than in the past, and it is unlikely that substantial increases will ever again be possible (FAO, 2000). Inland and marine aquaculture production grew by about 5% annually during the 1950s and 1960s, by about 8% per year during the 1970s and 1980s, and by some 10% per year during the 1990s ...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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Suspended sediment discharge Suspended sediment discharge
Asia exhibits the largest runoff volumes and, therefore, the highest levels of sediment discharge. Due to their high precipitation, the Oceanic Islands have disproportionately high-suspended sediment loads (Gleick, 1993).
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), 2008
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Renewable surface water produced internally Renewable surface water produced internally
It is difficult to determine the amount of renewable water produced internally from the total renewable water resources (external and internal). However the FAO gives a rather precise definition of this indicator. Internal Renewable Water Resources (IRWR) includes: - Average precipitation: long-term double average over space and time of the precipitation falling on the country in a year. - Surface water produced internally: long-term average an...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Impact of sea level rise in Bangladesh Impact of sea level rise in Bangladesh
Impact of sea level rise in Bangladesh. three maps in a time relapse resulting in 18 million people affected, 22,000 km2 of land submerged by flooding.
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, February 2008
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Trends in global water use by sector Trends in global water use by sector
The greyband represents in the difference between the amount of water extracted and that actually consumed. Water may be extracted, used, recycled (or returned to rivers or aquifers) and reused several times over. Consumption is final use of water, after which it can no longer be reused. That extractions have increase at a much faster rate is an indication of how much more intensively we can now exploit water. Only a fraction of water extracted i...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Main world’s river basins Main world’s river basins
Reservoirs are artificial lakes, produced by constructing physical barriers across flowing rivers, which allow the water to pool and be used for various purposes. The volume of water stored in reservoirs worldwide is estimated to be 4,286 km3 (Groombridge and Jenkins, 1998). Wetlands include swamps, bogs, marshes, mires, lagoons and floodplains. The 10 largest wetlands in the world by area are: West Siberian Lowlands (780,000-1,000,000 km2), Ama...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, February 2008
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Excessive withdrawal of renewable water resources Excessive withdrawal of renewable water resources
The countries known to be experiencing stress or scarcity of water per capita are roughly those which are excessively using their renewable water resources (North Africa, Middle-East and central Asia including Afghanistan and Pakistan). Excessive use is also of concern in some of the northern European countries such as Germany, Denmark or Poland. More so, as a consequence of damming, the Tigris and Euphrates in the eastern mountains of Turkey are...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), February 2006
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