Graphics Library >> global

Region: global

Distribution of coldwater and tropical coral reefs
Coral reefs are marine ridges or mounds, which have formed over millennia as a result of the deposition of calcium carbonate by living organisms, predominantly corals, but also a rich diversity of other organisms such as...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
canyondsw
About canyondsw
29 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
stocks
About stocks
29 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in natural disasters
With growing population and infrastructures the world’s exposure to natural hazards is inevitably increasing. This is particularly true as the strongest population growth is located in coastal areas (with greater exposur...
29 Nov 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Acidification due to climate change - impacts for oceans and coral reefs
As carbon concentrations in the atmosphere increase from land use changes and emissions from fossil fuels - so do concentrations in the ocean, with resultant acidification as a natural chemical process. The skeletons of ...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) - Mauna Loa or Keeling curve
Atmospheric concentration of CO2 is steadily rising, and oceans directly assimilate CO2. As ocean concentration of CO2 increases, the oceans automatically become more acidic. This, in turn, may have severe impacts on co...
01 Nov 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
shelfwater
About shelfwater
29 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Major pathways and origins of invasive species infestations in the marine environment
All across the planet, the number and severity of outbreaks and infestations of invasive species (i.e. species purposefully or accidentally introduced in non-native environments) is growing, and invasions of marine habit...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Primary threats to the marine environment
Each of the big five stressors (not in order of magnitude), 1) Climate change; 2) Pollution (mainly coastal), 3) Fragmentation and habitat loss (from e.g. dredging/trawling, use of explosives in fishing on coral reefs et...
01 Nov 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Invasive species in the marine environment - problem regions
The locations of major problem areas for invasive species infestations or occurrence of exotic species in the marine environment. The impacted areas are concurrent with the areas subjected to the worst pollution, the mo...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
scenarios
About scenarios
29 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Tropical cyclone frequency
Tropical cyclones, or hurricanes or typhoons, are storm weather systems, characterised by a low pressure centre, thunderstorms and high windspeeds. As the name testifies, these occur in the areas between the tropics, in ...
09 Oct 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in fisheries and aquaculture production (2000-2005)
The world's marine fisheries have stagnated or slightly declined in the last decade, offset only by increases in aquaculture production. A major reason why the decline has not become more evident is likely because of adv...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Global International Waters Assessment (GIWA) case studies
The Global International Waters Assessment (GIWA) is an example of a comprehensive strategic assessment designed to identify priorities for remedial and mitigatory actions in international waters. This graphic shows GIWA...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in continental river discharge
River flow is cyclical in nature, with alternating cycles of wet and dry years. This graphic uses bar graphs to show the average annual volumes of river runoff in cubic kilometres for each continent from 1921 to 1985. Ov...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Global International Waters Assessment Tools
Global International Waters Assessment's (GIWA) assessment tools for monitoring the world's water resources, incorporating five major environmental concerns and application of the DPSIR framework (driving forces-pressure...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Coastal population and altered coastal zones
Coastal areas with high population densities are those with the most shoreline degradation or alteration. Densely populated areas close to seas are also the most attractive for a lot of economic activity. The graphic sho...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Benefits from marine and coastal ecosystems and activities
Besides the well-known economic value of fisheries, there are several other activities generating significant revenues in coastal and marine areas. This graphic discusses the economic benefits of coastal tourism, trade a...
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Global capture fisheries and aquaculture production, 1950-1999
The global fisheries catch has levelled off, reflecting a growing decline in most major fishing areas. This graphic shows the amount of global aquaculture production and of global capture fishery catches in millions of t...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Global sediment loads
Asia exhibits the largest runoff volumes and, therefore, the highest levels of sediment discharge. This graphic shows the amounts of suspended sediments discharged, in millions of tonnes per year, in the major regions of...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal