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Changing percentages of selected municipal wastes Changing percentages of selected municipal wastes
Municipal waste is everything collected and treated by municipalities. Only part of it is comes from households, the rest is generated by small businesses, commercial and other municipal activities. A typical trend: as countries get richer, the organic share decreases whereas the paper and plastic ones increase.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Species diversity in the world's seas Species diversity in the world's seas
The graphic compares the amount of diversity of marine mammals, sharks, molluscs, birds, shrimp and lobsters in various sea regions. Coral reefs are among the most productive and diverse of all natural ecosystems. Recent decades have been catastrophic for them, however; some 10% of the world’s reefs may already have been degraded beyond recovery, and another 30% are in decline. Meanwhile biologically rich coastal wetlands, including mangrove fore...
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Probability of gastroenteritis amongst bathers exposed to increasing faecal streptococci densities from samples taken at chest depth Probability of gastroenteritis amongst bathers exposed to increasing faecal streptococci densities from samples taken at chest depth
The graphic shows the probability of aquiring gastroenteritis when bathing in water containing faecal contaminants. Gastroenteritis is the irritation and inflammation of the digestive tract. This condition may cause abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Severe cases of gastroenteritis can result in dehydration.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World coal consumption World coal consumption
The graphic shows the world coal consumption from various regions in comparison to the world totals. It shows trends from 1990 to 1999 and predicts the patterns to 2020. The predictions to 2020 show a decrease in coal consumption in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Ùion. However, it shows a considerable increase in the North America and developing countries, causing the total global consumption to increase.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World population development World population development
World population exceeded 6.1 billion individuals in 2001, and is growing at about 1.3 percent annually. Over sixty percent of the world’s population lives in Asia, 13 percent live in Africa and 12 percent live in Europe; the remaining 14 percent live in the Americas and Oceania.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World oil consumption World oil consumption
The graphic the world oil consumption from various regions in comparison to the world totals. It shows trends from 1990 to 2001 and predicts the patterns to 2020. These predictions show an increase in total world oil consumption.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of CO2 per capita 1990 (selected countries) Emissions of CO2 per capita 1990 (selected countries)
The graph shows emissions of CO2 per capita 1990. CO2 can be emitted as byproduct from the use of fossil fuel, by combustion, land-use conversion and cement production. Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 are increasing, and it is indicated that this contributes to global warming and climate change.
28 Sep 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global CFC production Global CFC production
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), along with other chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds, have been implicated in the accelerated depletion of ozone in the Earth's stratosphere. CFCs were developed in the early 1930s and are used in a variety of industrial, commercial, and household applications.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Total world CO2 emissions from coal, gas and oil Total world CO2 emissions from coal, gas and oil
The graphic shows the world's total CO2 emissions in million metric tonnes carbon equivalent. Broken down into categories of total fuel fossil emissions, oil, natural gas and coal. CO2 is one of the main greenhouse gases and can, in addition to fossil fuel combustion( as shown on graph), be produced by cement production and land use conversion such as deforestation.
06 Nov 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected temperature changes, 2000 to 2100 scenario Projected temperature changes, 2000 to 2100 scenario
Average temperatures changes in the world according to the GFDL model (doubling of CO2 and temperature increase by 3,7°C from 2000 to 2100). According to this model, the changes will be most severe in the Arctic and the Northern hemisphere.
28 Sep 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Consumption of commercial energy for selected regions Consumption of commercial energy for selected regions
The graphic shows the amount of energy in gigajoules used by Africa and other parts of the world. North America is by far the biggest consumer of commercial energy, peaking at close to 350 gigajoules in 1995.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy supply in 1994 Energy supply in 1994
Shows Energy supply in 1994
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World fisheries and aquaculture production World fisheries and aquaculture production
Shows the amount, in million tonnes, of fish taken by capture and aquaculture fisheries, between the years 1950-1999. Also included is a diagram showing the percentage of the different types of aquaculture in 1998.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global freshwater withdrawal Global freshwater withdrawal
World map showing annual levels of renewable water resources for the year 2000 measured in cubic meters. The use of water varies greatly from country to country and from region to region. 'Withdrawal' refers to water taken from a water source for use. It does not refer to water 'consumed' in that use.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global soil degradation Global soil degradation
Overview of the state of global soil degradation in the world. The loss of arable land has been caused by a number of factors, many or most of which are tied to human development. The primary causes are deforestation, overexploitation for fuelwood, overgrazing, agricultural activities and industrialization.
06 Nov 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in fertilizer use Trends in fertilizer use
Shows estimated growth in fertilizer use around the world. Compares statistics from 1959-1960, 1989-1990 to the prediction of 2020. Published in, 'GESAMP Report and studies number 71, Protecting the oceans from land-baesd activities...'
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global fertilizer consumption Global fertilizer consumption
In recent years, there has been concern that the quantity of mineral fertilizers used in agriculture having adverse effects on the environment. Attention has been drawn to the fact that when nutrients are applied to crops they are not all taken up by the plants immediately. There is also concern that some farmers might be applying inappropriate quantities of fertilizer. The main fertilizers having adverse effects on the environment are nitrate, p...
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy consumption, current and estimated trends, by region Energy consumption, current and estimated trends, by region
The graphic shows energy consumption of oil, coal and natural gas in various regions around the world from 1990 to 2002 and predicts future consumption until 2020. Over the last decade developed countries have attempted to reduce the over-all energy demand.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human Development Index for the World regions in 1994 Human Development Index for the World regions in 1994
The UNDP Human Development Index (HDI) is a comparative benchmark indicator of living standards and development, taking into account poverty, literacy, education, life expectancy, childbirth, and other factors for countries worldwide. It is a standard means of measuring well-being, especially child welfare.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Long range transport of air pollutants to the Arctic Long range transport of air pollutants to the Arctic
The major industrial areas of the Northern Hemisphere are a source for long range transport of pollutants. The main air currents are taking industrial air pollution and circulating them with the end result being an increase of pollutants in the biosphere of the Arctic.
28 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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