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Total hazardous and other waste generation as reported by the Parties to the Basel Convention in 2001 (bar chart)
The Basel Convention has estimated the amount of hazardous and other waste generated for 2000 and 2001 at 318 and 338 millions tonnes respectively. However these figures are based on reports from only a third of the coun...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Ship owners and builders
When ships like oil tankers and cargo vessels pass their use by date they are broken up for scrap. Large ships are generally built by companies in countries like Japan, South Korea and Germany, but when it comes time for...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Emissions due to solid waste disposal on land
Landfi ling is the most common waste management practice, and results in the release of methane from the anaerobic decomposition of organic materials. Methane is around 20 times more potent as a GHG than carbon dioxide. ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Existing radioactive waste disposal and proposal alternatives for storage
Radioactive waste presents a unique problem, where it has to be handled with care to prevent radiation exposure for people, wildlife and contamination. Products from nuclear activities can be reprocessed to a certain deg...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Solid waste management cost for selected cities
Sound waste management requires a high level of technology and a signif cant budget. What Japan and Germany can afford today, most countries will have to wait a long time for. Developed countries have a lot to learn fro...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Hazardous waste generation in 2001 as reported by the Parties to the Basel Convention
Hazardous waste needs to be monitored and controlled from the moment the waste is generated until its ultimate disposal. Proper hazardous waste control requires a plan to reduce the amount of waste generated or the toxic...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
What is in a computer
On average a computer is 23% plastic, 32% ferrous metals, 18% non-ferrous metals (lead, cadmium, antimony, beryllium, chromium and mercury), 12% electronic boards (gold, palladium, silver and platinum) and 15% glass. On...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Waste generation from manufacturing industry (by sectors)
Turning raw materials into consumer products generates waste - depending on the technology used, the nature of the raw material processed and how much of it is discarded at the end of the chain. Very often manufacturing ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Transboundary movements of waste in 2000
Waste, including extremely hazardous waste like radioactive material, toxic heavy metals and poisonous PCBs are routinely being loaded into trucks, and transported across continents. Some is loaded onto ships and export...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
How long does it take for some commonly used products to biodegrade?
Pollution emitted in industrial areas represents a threat to human health and the surrounding natural resources. We have a tendency to believe that the production processes are the only source of environmental damage, an...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Global hazardous waste generation by type as reported by the parties to the Basel Convention for the years 1993-2000
Hazardous wastes can often be recycled in an environmentally sound manner. Wastes that cannot be recycled must be treated to reduce the toxicity and the ability of the constituents to move throughout the environment. Tr...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Contribution of various waste management systems to greenhouse gas emissions, 2002
The disposal and treatment of waste can produce emissions of several greenhouse gases (GHGs), which contribute to global climate change. The most significant GHG gas produced from waste is methane. It is released during ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Contribution from waste to climate change
The disposal and treatment of waste can produce emissions of several greenhouse gases (GHGs), which contribute to global climate change. The most significant GHG gas produced from waste is methane. It is released during ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Mercury pollution - transport and cycle
Mines use toxic chemicals including cyanide, mercury, and sulphuric acid, to separate metal from ore. The chemicals used in the processing are generally recycled, however residues may remain in the tailings, which in dev...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Different sources of danger and their impacts to the environment
Contaminated groundwater can adversely affect animals, plants and humans if it is removed from the ground by manmade or natural processes. Depending on the geology of the area, groundwater may rise to the surface through...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Composition of transboundary waste
According to the Basel Convention reports, of more than 300 million tonnes of waste (including hazardous and other waste) generated worldwide in 2000, a little less that 2% was exported. However 90% of the exported waste...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The richer we get, the more we discard - human consumption, waste and living standards
According to various scenarios, the economic development (presented in this graphic as Gross Domestic Product, GDP) will most likely continue for the next decades – but at a slower pace for those countries that can affor...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Total waste generation in selected OECD countries in mid-1990s
The Basel Convention has estimated the amount of hazardous and other waste generated for 2000 and 2001 at 318 and 338 millions tonnes respectively. However these figures are based on reports from only a third of the coun...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Emissions of organic water pollutants
Pollution emitted in industrial areas represents a threat to human health and the surrounding natural resources. We have a tendency to believe that the production processes are the only source of environmental damage, an...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Mining waste rock
Regardless of the type of raw material, its extraction always comes with an environmental cost. Most mining leaves a lasting and damaging environmental footprint. For example, during the extraction of common metals like ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal