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Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups
Language not only communicates, it defines culture, nature, history, humanity, and ancestry. The indigenous languages of the Arctic have been formed and shaped in close contact with their environment. They are a valuable source of information and a wealth of knowledge on human interactions with nature is encoded in these languages. If a language is lost, a world is lost. This deep knowledge and interconnectedness is expressed in Arctic song, subs...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Vegetation and land cover in the Arctic Vegetation and land cover in the Arctic
The land mass in the Arctic - Greenland and parts of Canada, Alaska, Russia and the Nordic countries - surrounds the Arctic Ocean. In the low Arctic, down to the temperate regions, the taiga coniferous forests represents a vast band of deep forests. North of the taiga, the tundra of the Arctic - with low vegetation, shrubs and various degrees of permafrosts spreads out. Beyond the tundra, there might be barren regions with only rock and few plant...
13 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas and World Heritage sites in the Arctic (CAFF area) Protected areas and World Heritage sites in the Arctic (CAFF area)
Protected areas have long been viewed as a key element for maintaining and conserving Arctic biodiversity and the functioning landscapes upon which species depend. Arctic protected areas have been established in strategically important and representative areas, helping to maintain crucial ecological features, e.g., caribou migration and calving areas, shorebird and waterfowl staging and nesting sites, seabird colonies, and critical components of ...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map) Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
The Arctic represents the northermost area of the World, the Arctic Ocean and the land areas that surrounds it. The region is characterized but cold temperatures, and ice and snow. The summers are short, but with long periods of daylight (midnight sun). The winters are long and cold and with periods with no sun (polar night). The Arctic Ocean is one basin that is mostly covered by sea ice, and is connected to the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The ...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Ratification of multilateral environmental agreements Ratification of multilateral environmental agreements
Multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) are a main component of international environmental governance. The number of MEAs created in response to global environmental challenges has risen steadily since the UN Conference on the Human Environment (UNCED) in 1972.
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic biodiversity - pressures and impacts Arctic biodiversity - pressures and impacts
The Arctic plays host to a vast array of biodiversity, including many globally significant populations. Included among these are more than half of the world´s shorebird species, 80% of the global goose populations, several million reindeer and caribou, and many unique mammals, such as the polar bear. During the short summer breeding season, 279 species of birds arrive from as far away as South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and South America to ...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The Arctic, as defined by summer temperature The Arctic, as defined by summer temperature
The Arctic is a region not easily delineated by one boundary or definition - it includes the Arctic Ocean and the land areas around it, including Greenland, Eurasia and North America. A climate definition of the Arctic is the 10 centigrade July isotherm. This limit roughly coincides with the treeline and represents a change in growing conditions for plants. As visible in the map, this also includes mountainous and alpine areas. The map also prese...
01 Nov 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Marine areas without protection in the Arctic Marine areas without protection in the Arctic
The coastal zones highlighted in this map include some of the very last continuous ecosystems where terrestrial, coastal and marine areas are industrially unexploited. Through co-management practices, indigenous peoples can retain their traditional subsistence rights while still protecting important traditional resources for future generations.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Permafrost distribution in the Arctic Permafrost distribution in the Arctic
Most of the Arctic is covered by ice and snow for more than eight and even up to twelve months a year, but conditions are highly variable, ranging from snow several metres deep each winter to the polar deserts of northern Greenland with only 50- 100 mm of precipitation annually. A large portion of the Arctic is underlain by permafrost. Permafrost, defined as ground that does not thaw for two or more years, can reach a thickness of up to 1000 metr...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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PCBs in the blood of Arctic residents PCBs in the blood of Arctic residents
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants) and heavy metals from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. While fear of these compounds sometimes has resulted in abandonment of traditional foods, this has also led to more unhealthy food habits acquired from non-indigenous peoples. Most indigenous peoples in smaller communities still supply a large share of their household foods from natura...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Vegetation zones in the Arctic Vegetation zones in the Arctic
The Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM) project is an international effort to map the vegetation and associated characteristics of the circumpolar region, using a common base map. The base map is a false colour infrared image created from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Major and minor settlements in the circumpolar Arctic Major and minor settlements in the circumpolar Arctic
Indigenous settlements in the Arctic. As in the past, today's settlements are usually located in resource-strategic positions, with territoriality and social networks adapted to the movements of reindeer/caribou or the seasonal abundance of sea mammals. Most indigenous settlements are small, consisting of only a handful of people, while others are communities of several thousand people. Notice that many dots simply represent seasonal settlements ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Mercury levels in indigenous women Mercury levels in indigenous women
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants) and heavy metals from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. While fear of these compounds sometimes has resulted in abandonment of traditional foods, this has also led to more unhealthy food habits acquired from non-indigenous peoples. Most indigenous peoples in smaller communities still supply a large share of their household foods from natura...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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States, organizations and strategical issues in the Arctic: People across borders States, organizations and strategical issues in the Arctic: People across borders
Through numerous fora, Arctic peoples now seek to define a sustainable balance in their participation between the cash economy and their traditional pursuit. Their right to influence the future of the coastal regions is under heavy pressure from industrial fisheries and exploration activities based much further south.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population distribution in the circumpolar Arctic, by country (including indigenous population) Population distribution in the circumpolar Arctic, by country (including indigenous population)
The Arctic represents one of the most desolate and sparsely populated areas in the World, with few economic opporunities and inhostile climate. This map - based on the Arctic Human Development Report (AHDR) definition of the Arctic, presents the distribution by country. Note that except for Greenland and Northern Canada, indigenous peoples form a minority, though they can form the majority in local communities. They are therefore particularly vul...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial development in the Arctic Industrial development in the Arctic
Industrial development in the Arctic. The Arctic has been opened up for increased exploration of petroleum, gas and mining activities. The Barents Sea, the Mackenzie Valley in Canada and the Alaskan North Slope, are the areas of chief interest at the moment. Please note that the shipping routes in Northern Canada are not open today for commercial shipping because of sea ice. The Northern Sea Route north of Russia is partly open today.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Satellite observations in Arctic sea ice, 1979 and 2003 Satellite observations in Arctic sea ice, 1979 and 2003
This oblique view of the Arctic polar ice cap in September shows the significant reduction that has happened over a time period just over 20 years, from 1979 to 2003. Future predicitions shows even more drastic reduction of the ice cap, thus opening new area for natural resources extraction and marine transports. Please also see an updated graphic at: http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/arctic-sea-ice-minimum-extent-in-september-1982-2005-and-2007
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Infant mortality in selected regions of the Arctic Infant mortality in selected regions of the Arctic
Infant mortality, a common health and human livelihoods indicator, is generally higher among indigenous peoples than the average populations, and can be used as a general indicator on the level of health. This graphic shows the infant mortality rate in selected regions of the Arctic and compares them to the national averages.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic protected areas and biomes Arctic protected areas and biomes
Using the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) definition of the Arctic, the majority of the current protected area (pie cheart to the left) is in the Arctic desert biome (45%), followed by the tundra biomes (29%). When looking at the total area that is currently protected in each biome, this shows that almost a third of the desert biome is protected (right figure).
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas in the Arctic Protected areas in the Arctic
Protected areas of the Arctic as recognized by the IUCN in the World Protected Areas Database at UNEP-WCMC, 2005. Some areas, like the Dehcho territory in Canada have been placed under interim protection. Information from Russia may be incomplete. Note the lack of marine protected areas, despite their ecological significance and importance to indigenous peoples.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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