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Region: barentsregion

Population centres in the Barents Region Population centres in the Barents Region
The Barents Region is an European Region, populated by 4.4 million inhabitants. The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway.
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas the Barents Region Protected areas the Barents Region
There are pristine wilderness and unspoiled field and tundra landscapes, and the air and water in most parts of the Region is mainly clean. Several areas are protected for scientific research, park areas, and nature reserves and several more are being proposed as protected areas.
14 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Forests and ecozones in the Barents Region Forests and ecozones in the Barents Region
The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. This shows all the main ecozones of the region and their geographical coverage.
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Region, topography and bathymetry Barents Region, topography and bathymetry
The Barents Region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. The Barents Sea has anaverage depth 230 m, bordered by the shelf edge towards the Norwegian Sea in the west, the island of Svalbard (Norway) in the northwest, and the islands of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya (Russia) in the northeast and east.
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map
Nenets Autonomous Okrug is an administrative region in Arctic Northwest Russia, covering some 176000 sq km of tundra and marshland. The capital city of the region is Narian-Mar. Off the coast are parts of the Arctic ocean know as Barents and Kara seas, and the long island in the north west is Novaya Zemlya.
17 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2002 Human impact: Barents region 2002
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'sustainability first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'policy first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region
The impact of infrastructure development on reindeer potentially threatens the cultural traditions of the Barents region indigenous people and their chosen way of life. The probability of impact on wildlife, vegetation and ecosystems is related to distance to different types of infrastructure. The distance zones of impact are lowest in forest and highest in open tundra. The extent of the zones are based upon several hundred field studies from int...
26 Jan 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Julien Rouaud, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'markets first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'security first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas in the Barents ecoregion Protected areas in the Barents ecoregion
The Barents Sea ecoregion - the part of the World Ocean north of the Nordic countries and Northwest Russia, has a unique environment with major sea bird colonies, rich benthic and plankton fauna and many major sea mammal species. Within this ecoregion, this graphic illustrates the existing coverage of protected areas. One of the main threats to the region is the development associated with the expansion of fossil fuel extraction activities. Russi...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Reindeer herding - vegetation impacts (Norway and Finland) Reindeer herding - vegetation impacts (Norway and Finland)
A very high-resolution false color Ikonos-2 satellite image of Jauristunturit in the border zone shared by Norway and Finland. Image acquired 28 June 2001. The main vegetation type is lichen dominated tundra heath with dwarf shrubs. The difference in whiteness is due to lichen coverage, and the national border with reindeer fence visibly divides the area. The northern portion is Norway, where fruticose lichen coverage is higher. This is a consequ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Environmental threats in the Barents Region Environmental threats in the Barents Region
The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. This map indicates the political boundaries and economic areas in the region. More importantly it shows where environmental dangers are located and the level of grazing on pastoral lands. (Please note that the The Barents Euro-Arctic Council has expanded the membership since 1998)
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Region and the surrounding seas Barents Region and the surrounding seas
The Barent's Euro-Arctic Council was established in 1993 to promote inter-governmental cooperation in the northenmost parts of Sweden, Norway, Finland and north-west Russia. The cooperating region includes, in the Scandinavian countries, the counties of Nordland, Troms and Finnmark in Norway, Norrbotten and Västerbotten in Sweden, and Lapland and the province of Oulu in Finland. In Russia, it includes the Arkhangelsk and Murmansk Oblasts, the Rep...
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Region, topography and bathmetry Barents Region, topography and bathmetry
The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. The Barents Sea has an average depth 230 m, bordered by the shelf edge towards the Norwegian Sea in the west, the island of Svalbard (Norway) in the northwest, and the islands of Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya (Russia) in the northeast and east. (Please note that the The Barents Euro-Arctic Council has expanded the m...
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Air temperature in the Barents Region in summer Air temperature in the Barents Region in summer
The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. In order to better understand the trends in global warming accurate readings of temperature needs to be made. This map shows the average temperatures in the Barents region in July and is meant to show the difference in the January temperatures. (Please note that the The Barents Euro-Arctic Council has expanded the member...
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Ecosystems in Northwest Russia Ecosystems in Northwest Russia
The map shows the range of fourteen different ecosystem types across Russia. The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. (Please note that the The Barents Euro-Arctic Council has expanded the membership since 1998)
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Air temperature in the Barents Region in winter Air temperature in the Barents Region in winter
The Barents region is in the Arctic and covers the area of Western Russia and the northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway. In order to better understand the trends in global warming accurate readings of temperature needs to be made. This map shows the average temperatures in the Barents region in January and is meant to show the difference between the July temperatures. (Please note that the The Barents Euro-Arctic Council has expanded the m...
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Distribution of Saami dialects Distribution of Saami dialects
Saami dialects distribution with data from snowchange project. Graphic prepared for a case study in the 2004 edition of Vital Arctic Graphics on reindeer hearding, Saami and climate change in the Barents Region.
21 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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