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Region: balkan

Population displacements 1991 to 2001 Population displacements 1991 to 2001
All the states that emerged from the break-up of Yugoslavia are still fragile, except Slovenia, which joined the EU in 2004, and Croatia, which is well on the way towards European integration. Since the Dayton Peace Agreement (1995), Bosnia and Herzegovina has constituted a state, but split into two entities: the Republic of Srpska and the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, itself divided into 10 cantons.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Existing and estimated hydropower capacity in the Balkans, 2006 Existing and estimated hydropower capacity in the Balkans, 2006
Hydroelectric power covers a significant share of electricity consumption in the region (43 percent in 2004). Hydroelectric power dropped noticeably due to lower rainfall in 2002 and 2003, but the increase in overall electricity consumption nevertheless seems likely to continue driving demand upwards.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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Balkans: topographic and political map Balkans: topographic and political map
The Balkans includes Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Serbia and Montenegro (ex-Yugoslavia). The area is recovering from a long conflict and instability as a result of the dissolution of the former Yugoslavia.
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The Balkans - topography The Balkans - topography
Southeast Europe boasts a wide variety of landscapes, ecosystems and endemic species. What is unusual is that such valuable areas, which fully deserve protection, should often be located in two or more jurisdictions, as is the case here.
04 Oct 2005 - by Unknown
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