HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> ZW

Region: ZW

Climate change in Zimbabwe: trends in temperature and rainfall Climate change in Zimbabwe: trends in temperature and rainfall
Zimbabwe is experiencing more hot days and fewer cold days, and the amount of precipitation it receives is deviating from the mean more frequently. This resource includes two graphics. The first shows the number of days with a minimum temperature of 12 degrees Celsius and the number of days with a minimum temperature of 30 degrees Celsius from 1950 to 1990. The second graphic shows the amount of precipitation in millimetres that was a departure f...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Rainfall variability and economic growth in Zimbabwe Rainfall variability and economic growth in Zimbabwe
In Zimbabwe, trends in economic growth have been linked to rainfall variability, which can be attributed to sensitivity in the agricultural sector. Improved water resources management is critical to the stability and security that is required for economic development. The recent decline in growth can be caused by other factors such as land reform policies (starting in 2000).
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe
A study of households (rich and poor) in the Masvingo Province in southeastern Zimbabwe provides a good example of how agricultural income complements wild income and how it compares with other income sources such as wages and remittances. Agricultural income—from crops and home gardens—contributed 30 percent of total household income (cash and subsistence income combined). Livestock rearing—a modified form of agriculture that relies on wild fora...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe
A study of households (rich and poor) in the Masvingo Province in southeastern Zimbabwe provides a good example of how agricultural income complements wild income and how it compares with other income sources such as wages and remittances. Agricultural income—from crops and home gardens—contributed 30 percent of total household income (cash and subsistence income combined). Livestock rearing—a modified form of agriculture that relies on wild fora...
11 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3