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Protected areas and wilderness Protected areas and wilderness
Wilderness areas in the Arctic, representing vast expanses of tundra and taiga that sees very little human disturbance and stress have been determined by an analysis prepared by the UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre in 2001. Overlaid with protected areas, this graphic highlights the areas that are currently not under International protection, and thus should be made a priority for conservation.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Ecoregions prioritised for conservation, in the Arctic (WWF Global 200) Ecoregions prioritised for conservation, in the Arctic (WWF Global 200)
Ecoregions represent large areas with geographically characteristic fauna, flora and climate - both marine and terrestrial. This graphic presents the ecoregion definitions identified by the World Wildlife Fund and associated experts, and specifically those ecoregions that have been designated as priority areas (Global 200 database) for conservation. This means that these ecoregions represent unique biodiversity characteristics, and also that ther...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Sea vulnerability index Barents Sea vulnerability index
Areas that are vulnerable to pollution from oil and chemical spills where identified using a multiple index in a geographical analysis. Factors, including shoreline sensitivity, corals, benthic conditions, sea birds, marine mammals, fish and fisheries and other sea resources where taken into account and weighed for their importance.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Major wilderness areas in the Arctic Major wilderness areas in the Arctic
The Arctic covers around 33.5 million km2 and holds the largest continuous expanses of unfragmented wilderness in the world, outside of Antarctica. Indeed, seven of the ten largest wilderness areas in the world outside Antarctica are found in the high north. (UNEP/WWF 2001: 25 Largest Wilderness Areas in the Arctic). But in contrast with Antarctica, the Arctic is not uninhabited. Human cultures are and have been a part of these vast and rich ecos...
01 Oct 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Pathways of contaminants to the Arctic Pathways of contaminants to the Arctic
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants), heavy metals and other contaminants from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. This process is often referred to as long-range pollution or long-range transport of pollutants. While fear of these compounds sometimes has resulted in abandonment of traditional foods, this has also led to more unhealthy food habits acquired from non-indigenous pe...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Shift in climatic zones, Arctic scenario Shift in climatic zones, Arctic scenario
The scenarios from the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) project that temperatures will increase dramatically in the Arctic, more than in many other parts of the world. This leads to effects, such as the decrease of area (e.g. tundra) under continous permafrost, the northward move of the tree line and the decrease of Arctic Sea Ice. The synthesis is based on several different models and ensables and this map depicts the situation at the end...
01 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas in the terrestrial priority ecoregions in the Arctic Protected areas in the terrestrial priority ecoregions in the Arctic
Certain areas have been identified as priority ecoregions for conservation (WWF Global 200) due to their unique biodiversity characteristics. Significant parts of these regions are without any protection, as identified by the IUCN classifications. Protection is currently best in Arctic Russia.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic development scenarios, human impact in 2050 Arctic development scenarios, human impact in 2050
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the future impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities, using the GLOBIO model from the Global Envi...
01 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Sea ecoregion conservation priority areas and oil and gas infrastructure Barents Sea ecoregion conservation priority areas and oil and gas infrastructure
The Barents Sea ecoregion - the part of the World Ocean north of the Nordic countries and Northwest Russia, has a unique environment with major sea bird colonies, rich benthic and plankton fauna and many major sea mammal species. To identify priority areas for conservation, thirty experts delineated sea areas based on ecological criteria in a WWF study. One of the main threats to the region is the development associated with the expansion of foss...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Temperature increase in the Arctic, 2090 scenario Temperature increase in the Arctic, 2090 scenario
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) are presented in this figure, for the year 2090. The Arctic is a place where the effects of climate change are already very visible, and scenarios suggests that this will be one of the regions were the effects will be at its strongest.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Barents Sea - Oil free zones Barents Sea - Oil free zones
Proposal from the World Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF) for permanent petroleum-free zones in the Barents Sea. Areas covered with ice for parts of the year are also included in the proposed zones. The map has been drawn up by WWF Norway and is based on vulnerability analyses from Det Norske Veritas (April 2005) and mapping of fish resources from the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research (March 2005).
01 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic transportation routes - roads, shipping and pipelines Arctic transportation routes - roads, shipping and pipelines
Land infrastructure represents a fragmentation of the natural ecosystems, splitting up expanses of tundra and taiga - and creates a disturbance in the form of traffic. In addition, it promotes development of side roads, houses and facilities. Shipping doesn't present a threat in the same way, but there are risks related to goods that could present a hazard for the environment, such as oil.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups
Language not only communicates, it defines culture, nature, history, humanity, and ancestry. The indigenous languages of the Arctic have been formed and shaped in close contact with their environment. They are a valuable source of information and a wealth of knowledge on human interactions with nature is encoded in these languages. If a language is lost, a world is lost. This deep knowledge and interconnectedness is expressed in Arctic song, subs...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups
Areas show colours according to the original languages of the respective indigenous peoples, even if they do not speak their languages today. Notes: Overlapping populations are not shown. The map does not claim to show exact boundaries between the individual language groups. Typical colonial populations, which are not traditional Arctic populations, are not shown (Danes in Greenland, Russians in the Russian Federation, non-native Americans in Nor...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Fossil fuel resources and oil and gas production in the Arctic Fossil fuel resources and oil and gas production in the Arctic
The Arctic has been opened up for increased exploration of petroleum, gas and mining activities. The Barents Sea, the Mackenzie Valley in Canada and the Alaskan North Slope, are the areas of chief interest at the moment. With increased temperatures and climate change, it is expected that the commercial intrest for more extraction and exploration will increase, as well as shipping of the products. As sea ice decreases, the shipping lanes will beco...
06 Dec 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz & Hugo Ahlenius UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas in the Arctic Protected areas in the Arctic
The Arctic is a unique region in the world, with very little human activity and vast expanses of tundra and taiga that presents ecological values. This graphics presents the areas that currently are protected for conservation, as recognized by the IUCN in the World Protected Areas Database at UNEP-WCMC, 2005. Some areas, like the Dehcho territory in Canada have been placed under interim protection. The data for Russia has been updated from nation...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas in the Barents ecoregion Protected areas in the Barents ecoregion
The Barents Sea ecoregion - the part of the World Ocean north of the Nordic countries and Northwest Russia, has a unique environment with major sea bird colonies, rich benthic and plankton fauna and many major sea mammal species. Within this ecoregion, this graphic illustrates the existing coverage of protected areas. One of the main threats to the region is the development associated with the expansion of fossil fuel extraction activities. Russi...
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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World economy cartogram World economy cartogram
To highlight the distribution of wealth and power in the world of today, this cartogram sizes the countries according to their relative financial status, here presented through gross domestic product (gdp) per capita, offering an alternative world view to a regular map. Countries such as China and India become much smaller, next to giants in Western Europe, North America and Japan. Africa represents a minor speck, while South and Central America ...
13 Feb 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal, Vladimir S. Tikunov
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p08-09-hazards p08-09-hazards
No data.
13 Feb 2007 - by Bounford.com and UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Mass balance reference glaciers in nine mountain ranges Mass balance reference glaciers in nine mountain ranges
Thirty reference glaciers with almost continuous mass balance measurements since 1975 show an average annual mass loss of 0.58 m water equivalent for the past decade (1996–2005), which is more than twice the loss rate of the period 1986–1995 (0.25 m), and more than four times the rate of the period 1976–1985 (0.14 m). The results from these 30 continuous mass balance series correspond well to estimates based on a larger sample of more tha...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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