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Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090 - with shipping routes Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090 - with shipping routes
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) are presented in this figure, for the year 2090, with the surface temperatures over land, the size of the polar ice cap, and the outer limits of permafrost. This map features shipping routes in addition - as the sea ice is decreasing, the potential for developing shipping in the Arctic increases.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Re-infestation by 'Aedes aegypti' Re-infestation by 'Aedes aegypti'
Climate change affect the health of the population, not only through heat waves and waterborne diseases, but also as a result of the expansion of geographical areas conducive to the transmission of vector-borne diseases such as yellow fever, dengue and malaria. Species of mosquitoes, such as the group ‘Anopheles gambiae’, ‘A. funestus’, ‘A. darlingi’, ‘Culex quinquefasciatus’ and ‘Aedes aegypti’, are responsible for propagation of the majority of...
16 Sep 2006 - by Nieves López Izquierdo, Assosciate Consultant UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Uganda: quantifying the importance of environment and natural resources Uganda: quantifying the importance of environment and natural resources
Estimations calculate that the environment and natural resources sector should contribute USD 791 million to the Uganda GDP, excluding benefits like ecosystem services. In the formal figures, only USD 405 million is recorded, where subsistence use and informal markets are not captured. Over 90% of the employment in the sector is secondary processing and subsistence use. Sustainable natural resource use implies that this sector will continue to pr...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Economic impacts of Gorilla tourism in Uganda Economic impacts of Gorilla tourism in Uganda
Gorilla tourism in Uganda is primarily taking place in the Mgabinga Gorilla National Park and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, and represents one of the main destinations for wildlife tourism in the country. Estimations of the national and community level economic impacts in Uganda, based on a full capacity of 8760 tourists per year and expenditures of USD 874 were calculated to present the direct impacts, the indirect (secondary support activi...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Rainfall variability and economic growth in Zimbabwe Rainfall variability and economic growth in Zimbabwe
In Zimbabwe, trends in economic growth have been linked to rainfall variability, which can be attributed to sensitivity in the agricultural sector. Improved water resources management is critical to the stability and security that is required for economic development. The recent decline in growth can be caused by other factors such as land reform policies (starting in 2000).
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Pro-poor growth, absolute and relative definition Pro-poor growth, absolute and relative definition
Pro-poor growth is a term used for primarily national policies to stimulate economic growth for the benefit of poor people (primarily in the economic sense of poverty). Pro-poor growth can be defined as absolute, where the poor benefits from overall growth in the conomy, or relative - which refers to targeted efforts to increase the growth specifically among poor people.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Catches in the Mauritania Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) 1950-2002 Catches in the Mauritania Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) 1950-2002
Marine fisheries represent a significant, but finite, natural resource for coastal countries. The majority of the catches in some of the areas of the coast are not primarily by the coastal countries, but rather as in this example, where countries from Europe and Asia (Japan and South Korea are in the ‘others’ group) represent the majority. According to this estimation Mauritania only landed about 10% of the total catch in 2002, with Netherlands a...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Export of fisheries products in Africa Export of fisheries products in Africa
For some African countries, particularly in West-Africa and to lesser extent also countries along the Indian Ocean, fisheries contribute significantly to exports. Remarkable is also that the fish sector is important for a landlocked country like Uganda bordering Victoria Lake.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water, irrigated cropland percentage by region Water, irrigated cropland percentage by region
Irrigated land currently produces 40% of the world’s food on 17% of the world’s land. A broadening of irrigation and more effective rain fed agriculture will be necessary to meet the need for increasing agricultural outputs – for domestic use and exports.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe
A study of households (rich and poor) in the Masvingo Province in southeastern Zimbabwe provides a good example of how agricultural income complements wild income and how it compares with other income sources such as wages and remittances. Agricultural income—from crops and home gardens—contributed 30 percent of total household income (cash and subsistence income combined). Livestock rearing—a modified form of agriculture that relies on wild fora...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Employment in the travel and tourism industry in Africa Employment in the travel and tourism industry in Africa
About 6.3 million people work in the travel and tourism industry in Africa, where tourism is highly dependent on natural and cultural environment. However, since travel & tourism touches all sectors of the economy, its real impact is even greater.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Number of people in the mining sector in selected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa Number of people in the mining sector in selected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa
There is 1.5 million small-scale miners estimated to work within whole SADC region. Main countries for small-scale mining activities are Tanzania miners and Zimbabwe, where more people are involved in the small-scale, rather than in the large- and medium-scale mining industry.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water requirements for food production 1960-2050 Water requirements for food production 1960-2050
The requirements for water in agriculture in developing countries will need to increase in order to meet the Millennium Development Goal 1, target 2 'Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger'. To decrease hunger the outputs in agriculture will need to increase, and thus the water use. The data has been calculated for developing countries with minimum set of calories.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The composition and levels of wealth per capita for low-income countries The composition and levels of wealth per capita for low-income countries
In low-income countries, the natural section represents a quarter of the total wealth, this represents the land that is managed either by household, individual or communally, and the potential for generating income. Physical capital, represents a much smaller share as people will have less potential, compared to higher income countries, to acquire equipment, structures and infrastructure.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Government revenues from diamond exports in Sierra Leone Government revenues from diamond exports in Sierra Leone
The government of Sierra Leone saw a total of USD 5.2 million (2004) in revenues from diamond related activities. This comes in the form of mining, dealer and export license fees and from export taxes. To feed some of the revenues back to poor communities, the Diamond Areas Community Development Fund (DACDF) has been set up, with an annual commitment of 25% of revenue from export taxes. The intention is that this money will be dedicated to commun...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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EU fishing agreements to West and Central African countries EU fishing agreements to West and Central African countries
Fisheries activities by European Union countries in the seas of West Africa contribute EUR 120 million annually in government revenues. A part of the contribution is set for “targeted actions” to promote local resource management and sustainable development. For some of the poorest countries under these agreements – like Guinea-Bissau, the EU payments represent a significant part of the government revenues.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Contribution of forest to GDP, and ratio of forest exports out of total exports, for selected countries Contribution of forest to GDP, and ratio of forest exports out of total exports, for selected countries
Forestry provides more than 8% of the GDP in some of the poorest countries. In most of the developing country production is consumed domestically, but for some countries forestry contributes significantly to total exports like in Liberia and the Central African Republic.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Oil and gas development in the Mackenzie valley Oil and gas development in the Mackenzie valley
The Mackenzie Valley in Arctic Canada, Northwest Territories, represents one of the main sites for development of fuels extraction in North America. Activities, including the development of pipelines, impact indigenous peoples, as well as sensity environment.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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