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Land issues in the Ferghana valley Land issues in the Ferghana valley
The high demographic pressure on limited land resources coincides with a lack of jobs and economic prospects especially in marginalized areas but increasingly in the irrigated areas of Uzbekistan. These factors are triggering population movements to urban centers and the relatively less populated rural areas in the region.
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Oblasts in the Ferghana Valley area Oblasts in the Ferghana Valley area
One important outcome of the ENVSEC consultations in Osh in 2004 has been the re- establishment of communication between environmental authorities from the oblasts of the three countries constituting the Ferghana Valley. Environmental authorities within every region every day face common problems and challenges, but also every day their managers experience challenges of direct cross-border communication.
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Hazardous industrial waste in Kadamjai Hazardous industrial waste in Kadamjai
The Kadamjai antimony plant in southern Kyrgyzstan stands close to the Uzbek border and the town of the same name. The plant annually consumes 20 000 tones of ore. Ore waste dumps are exposed to erosion by rain and wind – resulting in contamination of soil and water resources by pollutants.
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population density in the Ferghana Valley province Population density in the Ferghana Valley province
Given the importance of agriculture for the whole Ferghana basin, natural resources such as land and water have historically been amongst the most important factor in this regions development. The size of the population depending upon these resources is consequently a key political security, and environmental issue. The Ferghana valley is the most populous area in Central Asia. High population densities increase the risk of depletion of natural r...
31 Oct 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population trends for Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan Population trends for Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan
Output by the Central Asian economies dropped sharply after independence with subsequent fall in living conditions. Poverty is widespread, especially in rural areas. Communal services have broken down in many areas, straining relations between local authorities and the population. Only recently have some of the economies shown signs of improving, but GDP growth rates have not helped to reduce poverty and social inequality. The unemployment rates ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Radioactive waste in Taboshar Radioactive waste in Taboshar
The Taboshar uranium mining site stands on the southern edge of the Kuramin Mountains close the Uzbek - Tajik border. The site consists of a non - rehabilitated open mine, dismantled production buildings, and three tailing sites storing 10 m tones of low grade processed uranium ore. The town of Taboshar with its 12000 inhabitants is only a few kilometers away.
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Rising water levels in the Spitamen district (Tajikistan) Rising water levels in the Spitamen district (Tajikistan)
Sudden releases of water into the Spitamen district from Kyrgyzstan are regularly endangering the neighboring Tajik arable land downstream and villages along the river. The Tajik communities are convinced upstream Kyrgyz communities are responsible for the flooding. However, local experts suggest that increased water levels in spring the later years may also be due to increased and rapid ice and snow melt down caused by a warmer climate in the hi...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Metal production in the South Kyrgyz mines of the Ferghana Valley Metal production in the South Kyrgyz mines of the Ferghana Valley
In the soviet period the industrial operations paid little attention to environment or public health, resulting in the accumulation of pollutants in the local environment. Because of their vulnerability to natural hazards, previous history of accidents, and their position along water courses and in the vicinity of towns and cities in transboundary areas, tailing dumps at both active and closed mining enterprises constitute an environmental as wel...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Walnut forest in the Jalal-Abad province (Kyrgyzstan) Walnut forest in the Jalal-Abad province (Kyrgyzstan)
The walnut forest is remnants of Central Asia Tertiary era subtropical forests. They are located primarily in the northern slopes of the Ferghana and Chatkal ranges of the Tien Shan and on the southern slopes of the Gissar and Darvaz ranges in Tajikistan. The Jalal-Abad walnut forests is currently under risk of man made damage due to wood fuel cutting, cattle grazing and land cultivating. The forest consists of a remarkable combination of walnut...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Environment and Security Initiative : Today`s priorities and future challenges Environment and Security Initiative : Today`s priorities and future challenges
The pilot phase of the initiative in 2003 assessed environmental threats in Central Asia and South –Eastern Europe, two regions where environmental concerns have clear security implications. The Southern Caucasus joined in 2004. Eastern Europe and the Circumpolar Arctic will be included in 2005-2006. In each region work stats by identifying, through consultation with national and regional stakeholders, priority environment and security issues and...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov and Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water withdrawal and availability in Aral Sea basin Water withdrawal and availability in Aral Sea basin
Agriculture is a mainstay of Central Asia’s economy. With the economic crisis following independence it has become even more important. Agriculture being almost entirely dependent upon irrigation, access to water is of strategic importance. Two major Tributaries – The Naryn and the Kara-Darya – both originating in Kyrgyzstan, join to form the Syr-Darya, one of the two largest rivers serving the Aral Sea Basin, and the key water resource of the wh...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Topography and hydrography of the Ferghana Valley Topography and hydrography of the Ferghana Valley
To date there are three main groups of issues that are relevant to environmental and security issues in the region. These are access to and quality if natural resources (primarily water and land but also forest and more generally biodiversity resources), existing or potential pollution from industrial facilities, hazardous and radioactive waste sites; and cross-cutting issues such as natural disasters, climate change, public health, environmenta...
03 Oct 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Gross National Income (GNI) kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan Gross National Income (GNI) kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan
The rationale of the common soviet market and economic system has disappeared, forcing Central Asian states to find their own position in the global market without the support of a redistributive economy. Their geographical position landlocked between two economic and political giants, china and Russia, makes their task difficult, especially in poor countries. All three economies are predominantly agricultural. They all rely on primary exports, e...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in regional average surface temperature in the Ferghana Valley area Trends in regional average surface temperature in the Ferghana Valley area
An important factor when looking at the region in terms of environment and security is the impact of climate change in Central Asia in general, and Ferghana Valley in particular. By modifying people’s livelihood, climate change may have an important security dimension in conjunction with other aggravating factors. In the Ferghana valley it is likely that climate change will primarily affect sector related to water and agriculture. Central Asia is...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population distribution in the Ferghana valley Population distribution in the Ferghana valley
Given the importance of agriculture for the whole Ferghana basin, natural resources such as land and water have historically been amongst the most important factor in this regions development. The size of the population depending upon these resources is consequently a key political security, and environmental issue. The Ferghana valley is the most populous area in Central Asia. High population densities increase the risk of depletion of natural r...
16 Mar 2006 - by Dominique del Pietro and Diana Rizzolio
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Water issues in the Ferghana Valley Water issues in the Ferghana Valley
Water is a basic production resource for agriculture. Competition for scarce water resources has been recognized as a potential source of international conflict. In the case of the Ferghana Valley, despite the very local character of the conflicts, the presence of international borders/or the implication of communities belonging to another ethnic group has loaded the conflict with a transborder and/or ethnic dimension. Earlier studies have shown ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley
Mercury mining, uranium mining, chemical and textile industries, oil facilities and processing plants which contribute to the contamination of the soil with highly toxic heavy metals are recognized as environmental challenges in the region. Even though past spills and contaminations have caused tensions between the different countries of the region, officials do not consistently regard environmental pollution by existing facilities as a security ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic map, political Arctic map, political
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga). This is a simple grayscale political map.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090 - with shipping routes Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090 - with shipping routes
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) are presented in this figure, for the year 2090, with the surface temperatures over land, the size of the polar ice cap, and the outer limits of permafrost. This map features shipping routes in addition - as the sea ice is decreasing, the potential for developing shipping in the Arctic increases.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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