HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Recent

Recent

Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map) Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
The Arctic represents the northermost area of the World, the Arctic Ocean and the land areas that surrounds it. The region is characterized but cold temperatures, and ice and snow. The summers are short, but with long periods of daylight (midnight sun). The winters are long and cold and with periods with no sun (polar night). The Arctic Ocean is one basin that is mostly covered by sea ice, and is connected to the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The ...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Curitiba, location Curitiba, location
Curitiba has become world-famous for its original approach to basic municipal problems thanks to a unique mixture of innovative town planning, determined political leadership and good public relations.
07 Oct 2005 - by Cécile Marin
4
Baltic Sea drainage basin Baltic Sea drainage basin
This 'basemap' displays the extent of the drainage basin (the boundary for the water that ends up in the Baltic Sea), and the countries in the region. The drainage basin represents all water that drains into the sea, through rivers and ground water.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Reference map for Kerala State, India Reference map for Kerala State, India
Displays the location Kerala State (Keralam) on a regional map (India + neighbouring countries), as well as on the globe. Kerala is located in southwestern India, on the west coast. The capital of the state is Thiruvananthapuram.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Kamchatka sites Kamchatka sites
Map, illustrating the communites, cities and sites from where the stories for the 'Indigenous Knowledge in Disaster Management' project has been collected and are refered to in the stories. Please see the project web-site for more information.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Poverty mapping study area Poverty mapping study area
This map represents the study area for the poverty mapping project for West Africa for generation of reliable statistical and cartographic products to communicate the relationship between rural poverty and land use potential in West Africa, in order to provide information to ensure optimal use of research investment.
07 Oct 2005 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Arctic sea routes - Northern sea route and Northwest passage Arctic sea routes - Northern sea route and Northwest passage
Sea routes along the edges of the Arctic ocean, or rather along the coasts of Northern Canada and Russia, holds potential for decreasing the number of days in shipping goods from the Pacific to Atlantic coasts in Europe and North America, and vice versa. In addition, this could provide a means to transport natural resources, such as oil and gas, extracted in the Arctic. Currently these routes have not been possible to use this, due to the ice con...
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Human impact, year 2002 (Miller cylindrical projection) Human impact, year 2002 (Miller cylindrical projection)
The GLOBIO-2 model is based on settlements and modern infrastructure such as roads, powerlines and pipelines. This map presents the current situation, as a baseline for the GEO-3 scenarios. The main wilderness areas in the world are the Arctic, the Amazon, desert areas and the Tibetan plateau. This maps uses an older color scheme that does not differentiate between the three impact classes used in the GLOBIO-2 maps after 2001.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact, year 2002 Human impact, year 2002
The GLOBIO-2 model is based on settlements and modern infrastructure such as roads, powerlines and pipelines. This map presents the current situation, as a baseline for the GEO-3 scenarios. The main wilderness areas in the world are the Arctic, the Amazon, desert areas and the Tibetan plateau.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact - Asian continent Human impact - Asian continent
Continental Asia is a hotspot for both biodiversity, wilderness abut also home to a majority of the World's population. The GLOBIO analysis shows that this region has seen quite significant human impacts, but with remaining wilderness in areas that has so far not been very attractive for human development - the Himalayas, the Tibetan highlands, and the Arctic regions of Russia.
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
5
Human impact - Africa Human impact - Africa
Africa is home to some of the greatest wilderness areas in the world, as well as some of the greatest biodiversity hotspots. The GLOBIO analysis shows that the great deserts and the Central African rain forests have huge remaining tracts that show low human impact and development.
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
3
Human Impact - North America Human Impact - North America
Most areas of North America that have any economic significance - for agriculture, habitation or siliviculture has been converted and modifiedf for human use. Areas with lower degrees of disturbance and fragmentation are found in the vast Arctic areas of Canada and Alaska, as well as in the mountain ranges.
13 Sep 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
3
Human impact - West Asia Human impact - West Asia
Vast areas of the West Asia region are sparsely populated, and are showing low fragmentation, but these are the unproductive desert areas, which naturally have quite low biodiversity (although there might be rare species there).
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
3
Human impact - Southeast Asia and Australia Human impact - Southeast Asia and Australia
The region, with Australia, New Guinea and Indonesia have unique flora and fauna with high biodiversity and many areas that has seen little human impact. Population pressures, especially in Indonesia, are starting to threaten these unique habitats, with species such as Orangutan.
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
3
Human Impact on biodiversity - Latin America Human Impact on biodiversity - Latin America
Latin America has vast tracts of sparsely populated areas of high biodiversity, in the Amazon and the Andes for instance. The GLOBIO analysis shows that these areas have seen little human impact, while the coasts and the plains have disturbed and fragmented habitats, particularily for large mammals.
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
4
Human Impact - Europe and the Near East Human Impact - Europe and the Near East
The assessment and modelling of current impact on wilderness show that there are few areas in Europe proper that have seen little human impact - it is all broken up by roads thus lowering the value of habitats primarily for big mammals. Areas with wilderness qualities can be found in the Arctic and further East in this analysis.
26 Jan 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
4
Human impact, year 2002 (Interrupted projection) Human impact, year 2002 (Interrupted projection)
The GLOBIO-2 model is based on settlements and modern infrastructure such as roads, powerlines and pipelines. This map presents the current situation, as a baseline for the GEO-3 scenarios. The main wilderness areas in the world are the Arctic, the Amazon, desert areas and the Tibetan plateau. This maps uses an older color scheme that does not differentiate between the three impact classes used in the GLOBIO-2 maps after 2001.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Human impact: Barents region 2002 Human impact: Barents region 2002
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'sustainability first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002 Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the current impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4