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Land cover changes in desert areas 1700,1900,2000 and 2050 Land cover changes in desert areas 1700,1900,2000 and 2050
The main land use change in desert areas has been the conversion of relatively barren drylands for agricultural needs, partially through irrigation. The conversion has historically primarily been to use the land for grazing, but the 2050 scenario suggests that small areas on the fringes of deserts will be converted to cropland. The model otherwise predicts modest changes for 2050.
06 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change scenarios for desert areas Climate change scenarios for desert areas
SRES scenarios show the period 2071 to 2100 relative to the period 1961 to 1990, and were performed by AOGCMs. Scenarios A2 and B2 are shown as no AOGCM runs were available for the other SRES scenarios.
06 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact in desert areas 1700,2000 and 2050 Human impact in desert areas 1700,2000 and 2050
The impact of human activities on wilderness qualities has been modelled using the GLOBIO-2 model. The model uses infrastructure and settlements as proxies and measure the degree by which habitats have reduced their wilderness qualities, by fragmentation and disturbance. According to the model, huge tracts of desert areas are relatively undisturbed, the majority of highly impacted areas are in the drylands of Central Asia and North America.
06 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Invasive alien plants in South Africa Invasive alien plants in South Africa
Species that has been introduced on purpose or spread in the wild threaten livelihoods in agriculture or water resources. As illustrated in this map, some regions of South Africa have very high ratios of invasive alien plants and are subject to government projects to limit the distribution and information campaigns informing the public.
13 Feb 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of greenhouse gases in Norway, 1985-1996 Emissions of greenhouse gases in Norway, 1985-1996
The graph shows the total emission of 6 major greenhouse gases in Norway from 1985 to 1996 with projections to 2010. Greenhouse gases are largely produced through human activities including industrial processes, fossil fuel combustion, and changes in land use, such as deforestation.
06 Nov 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of N2O in Norway, 85-96 Emissions of N2O in Norway, 85-96
The graph shows emissions of N2O in Norway from 1985 to 1996. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is emitted to the atmosphere by both natural such as combustion and anthropogenic sources such as industrial processes and fertilizers.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of CO2 in Norway, 85-95 Emissions of CO2 in Norway, 85-95
The graph shows emissions of CO2 in Norway from 1985 to 1995 and estimates future emissions from 1995 to 2010. CO2 can be created by use of fossil fuel, by land-use convertion, combustion or cement production.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of greenhouse gases in Norway, C2F4 and C2F6 85-96 Emissions of greenhouse gases in Norway, C2F4 and C2F6 85-96
The graphic shows emissions of C2F4 and C2F6 in CO2 equivalents in Norway from 1985 to 1996. C2F4 and C2F6 are primarily results of the production process of alumunium. Their atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be around 50 000 years.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of N20 in Norway, 85-96 Emissions of N20 in Norway, 85-96
The graph shows emissions of N20 in Norway from 1985 to 1996 with projections to 2010. N20 can occour naturally or have anthropogenic sources such as fertilizrs, combustion and various industrial processes.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of methane 1985-2010 Norwegian emissions of methane 1985-2010
The graph shows emissions of methane in Norway from 1985 to 2010. It makes an estimate to 2010 according to the 1998-2001 long term program. Fossil fules, live stock and waste dumps are among the anthropogenic sources that create methane
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sale of pesticide in Norway Sale of pesticide in Norway
Due to the high latitude and a relatively short growing season in Norway, the number of pests is limited compared with middle and southern Europe. However, some weed species are more dominant due to a general wet and cold climate. In 1985, 1,529 tonnes of pesticide active ingredients were sold. This was reduced to an average of 803 tonnes between 1991 and 1996.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of SF6 Norwegian emissions of SF6
SF6 is a gas that is used in circuit breakers and other switchgear as an electrical insulator. SF6 is a highly potent greenhouse gas, over 23,900 times more effective at trapping infrared radiation than carbon dioxide.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of CO2 Norwegian emissions of CO2
Emissions of carbon dioxide in Norway, 1985-1997, with projections up to 2010 (with a current measures scenario, as of 1997). Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is the main agent of greenhouse gases that is released primarily from the burning of fossil fuels, in cars, industry and homes.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of CF4 and C2F6 Norwegian emissions of CF4 and C2F6
The graph shows emissions of CF4 and C2F6 in Norway from 1985 t0 1996. CF4 and C2F6 are perfluorocarbons and primarily produced during the production of aluminium but also through semiconductor manufacturing. Emissions can be reduced by improving process efficiency
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sale of pesticides in Norway 1985-1995 Sale of pesticides in Norway 1985-1995
The graph shows the sale of pesticides in Norway from 1985 to 1995. Pesticides are chemicals or altered natural chemicals used in agriculture to control pests, to protect crops. Among these are various forms of insects, weeds, rodents and fungi.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of HFC in CO2 equivalents in Norway, 85-96 Emissions of HFC in CO2 equivalents in Norway, 85-96
The graphic shows Emissions of HFC in CO2 equivalents in Norway from 1985 to 1996 with projections to 2010. HFCs are among the most important greenhouse gases and are covered under the Kyoto protocol. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's) do not harm or breakdown the ozone molecule, but they do trap heat in the atmosphere, making it a greenhouse gas, aiding in global warming. HFC’s are used in air conditioners and refrigerators.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of N2O Norwegian emissions of N2O
Emissions of N20 have a role in the enhanced greenhouse effect. N20 is a long-lived gas, surviving in the atmosphere for about 130 years. The concentration of N20 in the atmosphere is increasing due to a variety of sources including a small contribution from coal combustion.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of SF6 in Norway, 85-96 Emissions of SF6 in Norway, 85-96
The graph shows emissions of SF6 in Norway from 1985 to 1996.SF6 is a highly potent greenhouse gas used in the industry for insulation in high voltage equipment and current interruption in electric transmission and distribution equipment.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of methane (1985-1996) Norwegian emissions of methane (1985-1996)
The graph shows Norwegian emissions of methane from 1985 to 1996. Methane is emitted to the atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these are fossil fuels, waste dumps, and livestock.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas in IUCN categories (I-V) in Eastern European countries Protected areas in IUCN categories (I-V) in Eastern European countries
The information on the state of biodiversity from 22 Central and Eastern European and former Soviet countries was assembled on the occasion of the 5th Conference of Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity in Nairobi May 15-26, 2000. It is a collaborative effort of the ENRIN national focal points of UNEP-GRID. This graphic shows protected areas in IUCN categories (I-V).
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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