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Registered projects implemented under Kyoto's 'Clean development Mechanism' Registered projects implemented under Kyoto's 'Clean development Mechanism'
Number of projects by host partiess and Number of projects by investor parties for various countries.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emission Assessment Emission Assessment
Emission Assessment visualizing raw material, transformed products, energy and workers and related activities flows.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emission calculators Emission calculators
Emission calculators for energy, transport sectors and various sectors found on non-profit, profit and offset providers.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Two scenarios for biofuels by 2030 Two scenarios for biofuels by 2030
Consumption in million tonnes of petrol equivalent and forecast plus area needed for sources in millions of hectares in various regions in the world.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Dirty coal is here to stay Dirty coal is here to stay
Coal producers already taking advantage of the oil shortage and might even more in the future. Visualizing main production basins and major consumers.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Carbon inventory Carbon inventory
Carbon stored by forests, Distribution of carbon inventory and Carbon inventory up to 2100.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Do you really save time? Do you really save time?
Train versus plane in a busy world. Schedules provided for train and plane for the following routes: New York-Washington D.C., Tokyo-Osaka, Paris-London and Hamburg-Münich.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Certified Emission Reductions Certified Emission Reductions
One certified emission reduction unit is equivalent to a one-tonne reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (measured in CO2 equivalent).
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Turn it off! Turn it off!
Household appliances with a standby mode and CO2 emissions from standby mode. Displayed in million tonnes per year for various countries all around the world.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change global processes and effects Climate change global processes and effects
Climate change global processes and effects involving human activities, main climate features and major threats.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Eco-design strategies Eco-design strategies
You do always have the option of remembering how much energy went into building your house.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Accounting units Accounting units
Countries that are signatories to the Kyoto Protocol have a tool for helping them in the Emissions Trading Scheme. In the Kyoto scheme each allowance is called an Assigned Amount Unit (AAU). Each entity equals one tonne of CO2 equivalent.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Energy consumption by usage in a building Energy consumption by usage in a building
Buildings (residential and commercial) account for 10 to 15% of all greenhouse gas emissions, including almost 70% carbon dioxide and 25% methane.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Animal proteins: the good, the bad and the ugly Animal proteins: the good, the bad and the ugly
Meat imports in 2005 and Meat consumption displayed as kilograms of CO2 equivalents per 100 kilocalories of product for major countries around the world.
04 Jun 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Freshwater biodiversity and poverty in eastern Africa Freshwater biodiversity and poverty in eastern Africa
Red areas where high percentage of children with stunted growth - used as a proxy for poverty - coincide with a high freshwater biodiversity index - a proxy for biodiversity - likely indicate areas in which poor people have no other choice than to unsustainably extract resources, in turn threatening biodiversity.
01 Nov 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Relationship between biodiversity and poverty in Africa Relationship between biodiversity and poverty in Africa
This map may be used to show areas in which biodiversity is threatened in relation to poverty on a continental scale. Areas where high percentage of underweight children - used as a proxy for poverty - coincide with a high occurrence of amphibian species and endemic bird areas - a proxy for biodiversity - may indicate areas in which poor people likely have no other choice than the unsustainable extraction of resources, in turn threatening biodive...
01 Nov 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global poverty-biodiversity map Global poverty-biodiversity map
This map may be used to show areas in which biodiversity is threatened. Areas where high poverty and high population density coincides with high biodiversity may indicate areas in which poor people likely have no other choice than to unsustainably extract resources, in turn threatening biodiversity. The map has been produced from three primary data sources – stunted growth data collected on first level administrative units from FAO (FAO 2004), po...
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global development and biodiversity Global development and biodiversity
Some of the world's least developed countries are located in hotspot areas of high importance for biodiversity. This map displays Human Development Index (UNDP) by country and hotspot regions overlaid on that.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Relative biodiversity scenarios for deserts 2000-2050 Relative biodiversity scenarios for deserts 2000-2050
The relative species abundance, as a ratio of the biodiversity before the advent of man, is high in desert areas. The areas are relatively pristine and has seen little changes induced by human activities. Impacts are most clearly seen at the edges of deserts, in the basins of western North America, along Baja California, and in the drylands of Central Asia and the inland Far East. The graphic is using the IPCC SRES A2 experiment as a parameter.
06 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change scenarios for desert areas by 2050 Climate change scenarios for desert areas by 2050
In desert areas by 2050, the majority of the temperature increase, according to the NCAR-CCSM3 model (and the IPCC SRES A2 scenario), will occur in the Northern Sahara, western Australia and in the inland deserts of North America. The precipitation will increase closer to the equator, but with large decreases primarily in Australia.
06 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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