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A multifunctional perspective of agriculture
In IAASTD, multifunctionality is used solely to express the inescapable interconnectedness of agriculture’s different roles and functions. The concept of multifunctionality recognizes agriculture as a multi-output activi...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected gains (losses) for countries under Doha scenario for agriculture
Agricultural trade offers opportunities for developing countries to benefit from larger scale production for global markets, acquire some commodities cheaper than would be possible through domestic production, and gain a...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Areas of physical and economic water scarcity
Under current water use practices, increases in population and changes in diet are projected to increase water consumption in food and fiber production by 70-90%. If demands for biomass energy increase, this may aggravat...
03 Jan 2008 - by Unknown
Total public agricultural research expenditures by region, 1981-2000
During a 20 year period between 1981 to 2000 the amount of agricultural research by developing nations has outgrown those of higher income countries. The increase has been steady throughout the entire period as it is in ...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Land area: Conventional and genetically modified crops
While many regions are actively experimenting with GMOs at a small scale, the highly concentrated cultivation of GM crops in a few countries (nearly three-fourths in only the US and Argentina, with 90% in the four countr...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected impact of climate change
Future climate change and projected impacts: Increased growth and yield rates due to higher levels of carbon dioxide and temperatures could result in longer growing seasons. For example, in mid to high latitude regions, ...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in real commodity prices
Agriculture is a fundamental instrument for sustainable development; about 70% of the world’s poor are rural and most are involved in farming. National policy needs to arrive at a balance between a higher prices which ca...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Market concentration
Agricultural trade is increasingly organized in global chains, dominated by a few large transnational buyers (trading companies, agrifood processors and companies involved in production of commodities). In these globaliz...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Cost of coffee from farm gate to coffee shop
Ensuring policy space for all these countries to maintain prices for crops that are important to food security and rural livelihoods is essential. Agricultural policies in industrialized countries, including export subsi...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and land use
Changes in land use have negatively affected the net ability of ecosystems to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. For instance, the carbon rich grasslands and forests in temperate zones have been replaced by crops with...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Major genetically modified crop production countries, 2006
Some regions report increases in some crops and positive financial returns have been reported for genetically modified cotton in studies including South Africa, Argentina, China, India and Mexico. In contrast, the US and...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Developing countries: share of agricultural exports in the world market (Hong Kong scenario)
Agricultural trade can offer opportunities for the poor, but there are major distributional impacts among countries and within countries that in many cases have not been favorable for small-scale farmers and rural liveli...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Top 10 global food retailers
Agricultural commodities the world have seen a decline in prices accompanied by wide fluctuations over the past decades. IAASTD projections of the global food system indicate a tightening of world food markets, with incr...
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Pig farming in the Caucasus ecoregion
Over the recent number of years, as the economy came to a standstill, individual farms have replaced collective farming and subsistence agriculture and livestock breeding (cattle, sheep and goat) have became common. Alon...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Sheep and goats in the Caucasus ecoregion
Over the recent number of years, as the economy came to a standstill, individual farms have replaced collective farming and subsistence agriculture and livestock breeding (cattle, sheep and goat) have became common. Alon...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Unemployment in the Caucasus ecoregion
High unemployment is one of the driving forces behind the degradation of ecosystems in the region. Upon the break-up of the Soviet Union the situation worsened as the economy was restructured. After almost two decades th...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Pasture land in the Caucausus ecoregion
Overgrazing and uncontrolled livestock grazing threatens steppe, subalpine and alpine ecosystems. A third of pasturelands in the region are subject to erosion. Sheep grazing in the winter ranges and the steppes and semi-...
29 Jan 2008 - by WWF-Caucasus, design Manana Kurtubadze
Forests in the Caucasus ecoregion
About 17% of the total land area of the Caucasus is covered by forests, primarily found between altitudes of 500-2000m and growing on steep slopes. Most forests are broadleaf forests but a number of different types are f...
01 Nov 2008 - by WWF-Caucasus, design Manana Kurtubadze
Protected areas, priority conservation areas and wildlife corridors in the Caucausus
This map shows protected areas, priority conservation areas and wildlife corridors identified in 'Eco-regional Conservation Plan for the Caucasus'. Priority conservation areas were agreed where there is important concent...
29 Jan 2008 - by WWF-Caucasus
Demography of the Caucausus ecoregion, rural and urban population
The Caucasus ecoregion, which includes the countries of Georgia, Azerbaijan and Armenia, and parts of Russia, Turkey and Iran, has three main urban centres - Yerevan, Tbilisi and Baku. Rural population is primarily distr...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Poverty levels in the Caucasus ecoregion
The Caucasus ecoregion, with the countries Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia and parts of Russia, Turkey and Iran represents a region in transition. Poverty is a key factor in human and economic development. The highest level...
06 Nov 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Heavy industry in the Caucasus ecoregion
The Caucasus region is important in terms of heavy industry. Being rich with natural mineral resources, extraction industry is playing an important role in the overall economic development. However, concerns related to u...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Climate zones of the Caucasus ecoregion
The Caucasus ecoregion covers an area of 580,000 km2, and includes six countries. The Greater Caucasus Mountain Range with its lofty peaks forms a formidable barrier between the northern and southern parts of the ecoregi...
29 Jan 2008 - by WWF-Caucasus, design Manana Kurtubadze
Poverty in the Caucasus ecoregion
The Caucasus ecoregion, with the countries Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia and parts of Russia, Turkey and Iran represents a region in transition. Poverty is a key factor in human and economic development. This map show sti...
06 Nov 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
The Caucasus ecoregion, topographic map
The Caucasus ecoregion covers a total area of 580,000 km2, includes six countries - Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Russian and Turkey - and follows the ecoregion definition prepared by WWF in their Action plan for C...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze, cartographer
Cattle in the Caucasus ecoregion
Over the recent number of years, as the economy came to a standstill, individual farms have replaced collective farming and subsistence agriculture and livestock breeding (cattle, sheep and goat) have became common. Alon...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Agricultural land in the Caucasus ecoregion
About 54% of a total of 44,019,400 ha of land is used for agriculture in the Caucasus. Most agricultural land is located in the plains, the Kuban-Azov plain, the Stavropol plateau, the Kura-Araks lowland and the Ararat v...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Transportation network in the Caucasus ecoregion
Transportation routes through mountain regions have always been of vital importance not just for mountain dwellers but also for traders between regions. In the Caucasus, transport routes are of immense importance as they...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
The Caucasus ecoregion, administrative units
The Caucasus ecoregion, between the Black and Caspian Seas, crosses 6 countries. Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia are fully contained in this ecoregion, while parts of the Russian Federation, Turkey and Iran are included ...
29 Jan 2008 - by Manana Kurtubadze
Shrinking of Fedchenko Glacier in the Pamirs of Tajikistan
Significant loss of glaciers in Central Asia began around the 1930s, and become more dramatic in the second half of the 20th century and continue into the 21st century. Glacier area was reduced in the Tien Shan and in th...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
West Stara Planina Mountains
In 2006, the Stara Planina Euroregion was established to foster trans-boundary cooperation between border municipalities in Serbia and Bulgaria, and assist governments with planning, and implementing cooperation and regi...
08 Feb 2008 - by UNEP/DEWA/GRID-Europe
Glacier shrinking on Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, Canadian Arctic
A new glacier inventory based on satellite data shows that the glacier cover reduced by about 22 per cent between the Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum extent and 2000. Changes in glacier area and volume are being used as ind...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Caucasus ice-rock avalanche in Russian Republic of North Ossetia
An ice-rock avalanche in the Kazbek region sheared off almost the entire Kolka Glacier and devastated the Genaldon valley. The satellite images show the region before (July 22, 2001) and after (October 6, 2002) the ice-r...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic map, political
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in s...
11 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessmen...
11 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The expansion of the European Union, political map 1957, 1987, 1997 and 2007
The political map and landscape in Europe has changed drastically in the period of 1957-2007. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the European Communities was formed in 1957 by the treaty of Rome, with six signator...
11 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Poverty mapping study area
This map represents the study area for the poverty mapping project for West Africa for generation of reliable statistical and cartographic products to communicate the relationship between rural poverty and land use poten...
11 Feb 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resources - agricultural potential
Soils underpin the production of a wide range of agricultural and industrial goods and services. Soil productivity is essential to agricultural activities - for food security, cash income and supporting the livelihoods o...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trade in illegal wood products and corruption
Where government officials are keen to keep an eye shut for a share of the profits, the more the forests suffer. About 5 billion USD per year is estimated to be lost due to uncollected taxes and royalties on legally sanc...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected agriculture in 2080 due to climate change
With our climate changes, we have to adapt our ways to a new environment – in most cases warmer and possibly wetter and drier. Projections on the climate in the future provide some guidance for us, but how can we create ...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Human vulnerability and food insecurity – rainfall and economy in Sub-Saharan Africa
For Sub-Saharan Africa, patterns in economic growth follow precipitation patterns closely. As rainfall has decreased over the last 30 years, so has the financial development. Rainfed agriculture represents a major share ...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resources for pro-poor economic growth
To alleviate rural poverty, one way is to sustainably use the natural resources available to the people and the communities. By supporting and expanding fisheries, small-scale mining, forestry, ecosystem services and oth...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resources path to poverty reduction - diagramme
The rural poor of the World, and the poor countries that they live in, do not have much in monetary wealth - but natural resources represents a possible source of income. With the right support, on both the national leve...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The economy of legal wildlife trade
The trade in wild species can contribute significantly to rural incomes, and the effect upon local economies can be substantial. The high value of wildlife products and derivatives can also provide positive economic inc...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Catches in the Mauritania Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) 1950-2002
Marine fisheries represent a significant, but finite, natural resource for coastal countries. The majority of the catches in some of the areas of the coast are not primarily by the coastal countries, but rather as in thi...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The importance of small forestry enterprises in developing countries
It is estimated that exported timber only represents 5 per cent of the wood cut in tropical forests. 10 per cent is timber used locally and the majority - 85 per cent- of wood is for fuel. While exports are generally the...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The development potential - available land per capita, in land use class
The amount of land area available per capita provides a rough measure on the current carrying capacity for food security and for the development of additional agricultural products for export – such as biofuels. The calc...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Financial flows for developing countries
With increased globalization and a smaller world, money flows more easily and the flows have increased. Where aid once represented a majority of the funds from high income countries to developing countries, this has now ...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Money talks for turtles - conservation and economy
Marine turtles have been used for eggs, meat, shell, oil, leather or other products for 7000 years. Modern times have introduced another way for society to profit from these species - to generate economic income as a tou...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
World poverty distribution
Three-quarters of all poor people still live in rural areas. They are heavily reliant on natural resources for their livelihoods: soil, water, forests and fisheries underpin commercial and subsistence activities and ofte...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resource - solar power (potential)
More than two billion people cannot access affordable energy services today. They depend on inefficient locally collected and often unprocessed biomass-based fuels, such as crop residues, wood, and animal dung. Because c...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resources - minerals
In more than hundred countries around the world, miners dig minerals and metals out of the ground, satisfying a slowly but continuously increasing demand from industrial production, agriculture, construction, high-tech s...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Forests working for the global climate - Reducing Emissions from Deforestation in Developing Countries (REDD)
Carbon trading of credits from avoided deforestation could yield billions of dollars for tropical countries, according to an analysis by Rhett A.Butler, founder and editor from mongabay.com, a leading tropical forest web...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Government revenues from diamond exports in Sierra Leone
The government of Sierra Leone saw a total of USD 5.2 million (2004) in revenues from diamond related activities. This comes in the form of mining, dealer and export license fees and from export taxes. To feed some of th...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Forest vs. Agriculture – the case of the Mabira forest reserve, Uganda
The Mabira forest reserve, on the shores of Lake Victoria hosts valuable wildlife, serves as a timber resource, provides ecosystem services for the water balance and the rainforests represents a tourist destination. Foll...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
World map of forest distribution (Natural resources - forests)
Approximately 240 million of the world's poor that live in forested areas of developing countries depend on forests for their livelihoods. Forest and its products provide cash income, jobs, and consumption goods for poor...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resource - water (freshwater run-off)
Freshwater – a natural resource which has been adopted as a human right by the UN in 2002: 'the human right to water entitles everyone to sufficient; affordable; physically accessible; safe and acceptable water for perso...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Electrification and traditional fuels in Sub-Saharan Africa
The Southern African Development Community (SADC) consists of 15 countries, with 233 million inhabitants. Apart from Mauritius and the countries around South Africa in the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), the remai...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Natural resources - marine resources
Primary ocean productivity, as measured in grammes of carbon per square meter, from remote sensing imagery outlines the areas with rich marine life. These areas are characterised by an abundance of marine life and they p...
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Reforestation, town of Galma and surroundings, Niger 1975 and 2003
In 1970s and 1980s - years of environmental crisis, there were few trees remaining in Niger. Wind-blown sands razed farmers' young crops and they often had to plant crops three times to succeed. Since the middle of the 1...
01 Oct 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Fiji, topographic map
The Republic of Fiji is a small island country in the South Pacific Ocean. The country has a population of 850 000 people spread out over an archipelago of islands. The largest ones, Viti Levu and Vanua Leva houses the m...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Greenland, showing rates of surface-elevation change between the late 1990s and 2003
Mass-balance estimates for Greenland show thickening at high elevations since the early 1990s at rates that increased to about 4 cm per year after 2000, consistent with expectations of increasing snowfall in a warming cl...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Ecoregions in Antarctica
Antarctica represents a very unique and special case on our planet. With the richness of the Southern Ocean, the coasts and the Southern islands have relatively high biodiversity and biomass in the form of numerous sea b...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Major research stations in Antarctica
Antarctica is interesting for many types of researchers. For example, glaciologists study the ice and snow, while oceanographers look at the oceans. The ice, snow and oceans affect the global climate and are presently ch...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Historical trends in carbon dioxide concentrations and temperature
The more recent history, from the middle ages and up until now, show increasing temperatures, rising as the world emerged from the Little Ice Age (LIA), around 1850. With the industrial era, human activities have at the ...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic
Bird species that migrate to the Arctic coasts and wetlands arrive from nearly every corner of the planet. During the summer, the sun never or nearly never sets, resulting in a short but intensive breeding season when mi...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Temperature increases in the Antarctic due to climate change, 2090 (NCAR-CCM3, SRES A2 experiment)
Climate change, due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, has not lead as clear changes in the Antarctic as in the Arctic. Some of the ice shelves of the Antarctic peninsula have split up and...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Population distribution in the circumpolar Arctic, by country (including indigenous population)
The Arctic represents one of the most desolate and sparsely populated areas in the World, with few economic opporunities and inhostile climate. This map - based on the Arctic Human Development Report (AHDR) definition of...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Climate change - ice and snow and the albedo effect
Changes in the polar regions can cause more warming in the entire planet earth system through feedback effects. One such effect is the reduction of ice and snow due to warmer temperatures. When the white and gray snow an...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Northern Sea Route and the Northwest Passage compared with currently used shipping routes
Climate models project that summer sea ice in the Arctic Basin will retreat further and further away from most Arctic landmasses, opening new shipping routes and extending the navigation season in the Northern Sea Route ...
01 Oct 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Population and main oil and gas production areas in the Arctic
The Arctic represents one of the least populated areas in the world, with only sparse settlements and very few large cities and towns - in comparison with e.g. continental Europe. The largest cities are in Northwest Russ...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Vegetation density/distribution in the high Arctic
The current vegetation density and distribution in the high Arctic can be calculated using satellite images. The vegetation index, 'greenness' (NDVI) represents a benchmark of the presence and ratio of photosynthesis. In...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in s...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Cold places on the Southern Continent
Antarctica is the coldest, driest and windiest continent on Earth. This graph shows the annual temperatures and seasonal variation at three locations in Antarctica - the research bases Bernardo O'Higgins (Chile - on the ...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Antarctica, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
Antarctic is the fifth largest continent of the world at 14 million square kilometres and is covered by a permanent continental ice sheet. The ice is distributed in two major ice sheets, the East Antarctic and the West A...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Increases in annual temperatures for a recent five-year period, relative to 1951-1980
Warming is widespread, generally greater over land than over oceans, and the largest gains in temperatures for the planet are over the North American Arctic, north central Siberia, and on the Antarctic Peninsula. These r...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Protected areas, Arctic and Antarctic
Protected areas are very important for conserving biodiversity. In these areas, human activities are managed to achieve specific conservation goals, for example, to protect a certain species or to conserve a representati...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic sea ice minimum extent in September 1982 and 2008
The red line indicates the median minimum extent of the ice cover for the period 1979–2000. This figure compares the Arctic sea ice extent in September for the years 1982 (the record maximum since 1979) and 2008. The ice...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Extreme days and nights - daylight variation in the Arctic: Reykjavik, Murmansk and Alert
The Arctic and Antarctic have long nights in the winter and long days in the summer. Above the Arctic Circle (66 °N), there is at least one day with no sun– polar night, and one day with no night— midnight sun. This grap...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected temperature increases in the Arctic due to climate change, 2090 (NCAR-CCM3, SRES A2 experiment)
Climate change, due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, has lead to increased temperatures and large scale changes in the Arctic. The Arctic sea ice is decreasing, permafrost thawing and th...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Cryosphere - winter seasons, Northern and Southern Hemispheres
Seasonal variation in the extent of ice and snow cover is greatest in the Northern Hemisphere. Imagine the Earth with white caps on the top and bottom. The top cap increases by a factor of six from summer to winter, whil...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Coldwater coral reefs, distribution
Scientists are just beginning to learn about the many species in the remote, deep waters of the polar oceans. Corals, for example, are not limited to the warm, shallow waters of the tropics. They also exist in many cold,...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Vegetation and land cover in the Arctic
The land mass in the Arctic - Greenland and parts of Canada, Alaska, Russia and the Nordic countries - surrounds the Arctic Ocean. In the low Arctic, down to the temperate regions, the taiga coniferous forests represents...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Fisheries in the Southern Ocean
Fisheries, together with tourism, represents a major economic activity around Antarctica. In the old days whales were hunted for oil - these days fish and krill are captured for fish meal and human consumption. The areas...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups (major groups)
Areas show colours according to the original languages of the respective indigenous peoples, even if they do not speak their languages today. Notes: Overlapping populations are not shown. The map does not claim to show e...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Major research stations in the Arctic
The Arctic is interesting for many types of researchers. For example, glaciologists study the ice and snow, while oceanographers look at the oceans. The ice, snow and oceans in the Arctic and Antarctic affect the global ...
31 Jul 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The Antarctic hole
Despite progress achieved under the Montreal Protocol, the ozone “hole” over the Antarctic was larger than ever in September 2006. This was due to particularly cold temperatures in the stratosphere, but also to the chemi...
31 Jul 2008 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected impacts of climate change
Global climate change may impact food production across a range of pathways (Figure 17): 1) By changing overall growing conditions (general rainfall distribution, temperature regime and carbon); 2) By inducing more ex...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in population, developed and developing countries, 1750-2050 (estimates and projections)
Each day 200,000 more people are added to the world food demand. The world’s human population has increased near fourfold in the past 100 years (UN population Division, 2007); it is projected to increase from 6.7 bill...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Many of the largest rivers in the Himalayas Hindu Kush region are strongly dependent upon snow and glacial melt for waterflow
Except for the fact that glaciers are melting rapidly in many places, we do not have adequate data to more accurately project when and where water scarcity will affect irrigation schemes in full. Making accurate projecti...
02 Feb 2009 - by Ieva Rucevska, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Biofuels production 1975-2005 (ethanol and biodiesel)
Biofuels have grown quickly in demand and production (Figure 14), fuelled by high oil prices and the initial perception of their role in reducing CO2 emissions (FAO, 2008). Biofuels, including biodiesel from palm oil ...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Dietary change in developing countries, 1964-2030
As nearly half of the world’s cereal production is used to produce animal feed, the dietary proportion of meat has a major influence on global food demand (Keyzer et al., 2005). With meat consumption projected to incr...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
An increasing number of countries are leasing land abroad to sustain and secure their food production
The world regions are sharply divided in terms of their capacity to use science in promoting agricultural productivity in order to achieve food security and reduce poverty and hunger. For every US$100 of agricultural ...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Losses in the food chain – from field to household consumption
i.e., before conversion of food to feed. After discounting the losses, conversions and wastage at the various stages, roughly 2,800 kcal are available for supply (mixture of animal and vegetal foods) and, at the end ...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
FAO Commodity Price Indices
Although production has generally increased, the rising prices coincided with extreme weather events in several major cereal producing countries, which resulted in a depletion of cereal stocks. The 2008 world cereal s...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Trends in productivity 1981-2003 (greening and land degradation)
Unsustainable practices in irrigation and production may lead to increased salinization of soil, nutrient depletion and erosion. An estimated 950 million ha of salt-affected lands occur in arid and semi-arid regions, ...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Agricultural production increases, per commodity 1965-2008
The use of fertilizers accounts for approximately 50% of the yield increase, and greater irrigation for another substantial part (FAO, 2003). Current FAO projections in food demand suggest that cereal demand will incr...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Possible individual ranges of yield and cropland area losses by 2050
Figure 24: Possible individual ranges of yield and cropland area losses by 2050 with climate change (A2 scenario), non-food crops incl. biofuels (six OECD scenarios), land degradation (on yield and area, respectively, s...
02 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal