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Boundaries of the Arctic Council Working Groups Boundaries of the Arctic Council Working Groups
When defining Arctic regions, it is understood that no single, clear cut boundary exists to delineate their extent. Rather, this boundary will change with its application: environmental, biological, economic, jurisdictional, or social. For example the Arctic Council working groups have different definitions that reflect each of their interests. The Arctic Monitoring Assessment Program (AMAP), which predates the Arctic Council, created its ‘AMA...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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World oceans, a cornucopia of goods and services World oceans, a cornucopia of goods and services
Throughout the course of history, humans have been drawn to coastal areas to enjoy the bounty of the sea. As much as 40 per cent of the world’s population now lives within 100 kilometres of the shoreline (Martínez, et al., 2007) and this population continues to grow – increasing our reliance and impact on the ocean and coast. Two thirds of the world’s megacities are on the coast.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Tourism in SIDS Tourism in SIDS
Tourism is a vital sector of the economies of most SIDS. For more than half of the SIDS, it is their largest source of foreign exchange. The social, economic and environmental well-being of many SIDS is tied to this sector (UNDESA 2010). Tourism receipts represent more than 30% of their total exports; in comparison, the average for the world is just over 5% (World Bank 2011).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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The importance of fish for selected SIDS The importance of fish for selected SIDS
Globally, 180 million people are engaged in fisheries and aquaculture activities, which sustain over 0.5 billion people, while small scale fisheries employ close to 110 million people (FAO 2010). Many small-scale operators are self-employed and engaged in both subsistence and commercial activities (FAO 2011). Aggregate capture fisheries play a major role in many national economies, especially in the Pacific SIDS, where capture fisheries can con...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Small-scale fishery, large employment Small-scale fishery, large employment
Many small-scale operators are self-employed and engaged in both subsistence and commercial activities (FAO 2011). Aggregate capture fisheries play a major role in many national economies.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Low Elevation Coastal Zones and CO2 Emisions Low Elevation Coastal Zones and CO2 Emisions
SIDS face a number of challenges in pursuit of energy security and poverty reduction, including high and rising oil prices, inadequate policies and regulations, insufficient promotion and investment in renewable energy and energy efficiency; lack of financing and technology transfer.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Ecological footprint and the wealth of SIDS Ecological footprint and the wealth of SIDS
Small island developing states (SIDS) are a group of countries that “share similar sustainable development challenges, including small population, limited resources, susceptibility to natural disasters, vulnerability to external shocks and excessive dependence on international trade. Their growth and development is often further stymied by high transportation and communication costs, disproportionately expensive public administration and infras...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Waste management hierarchy Waste management hierarchy
Greening the waste sector refers to a shift from less-preferred waste treatment and disposal methods such as incineration (without energy recovery) and different forms of landfilling towards the “three Rs”: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. The strategy is to move upstream in the waste management hierarchy based on the internationally recognised approach of Integrated Solid Waste Management (ISWM)(UNEP 2011).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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SIDS freshwater availability SIDS freshwater availability
SIDS, though surrounded by water, grapple with limited potable water supplies, poor potable water quality, sanitisation and inefficient distribution systems. The connectivity of the different components of the water cycle is also important, as shortages along one point affect another. Significant pressure is placed on existing freshwater systems in SIDS by urbanisation, unsustainable agricultural practices, the demands of tourism, mining and ...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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A great socio economic diversity for Small Island Developing States A great socio economic diversity for Small Island Developing States
Small island developing states (SIDS) are a group of countries that “share similar sustainable development challenges, including small population, limited resources, susceptibility to natural disasters, vulnerability to external shocks and excessive dependence on international trade. Their growth and development is often further stymied by high transportation and communication costs, disproportionately expensive public administration and infras...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Pacific regional waste composition Pacific regional waste composition
Waste management in SIDS, as in other developing countries, is a growing problem because of population growth, urbanisation, changing consumption patterns and the large numbers of tourists. Most of the waste collected is disposed of via sanitary landfilling, as opposed to recycling. This form of disposal represents missed economic opportunities and creates future challenges for SIDS due to the limited availability of land, potential contaminatio...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin trans frontier conservation areas Zambezi River Basin trans frontier conservation areas
The Zambezi basin has several large transboundary protected areas where two or more countries participate in managing shared natural resources. The creation of Trans Frontier Conservation Areas (TFCAs) in the basin is regarded as one of the anchors for regional economic integration, socio-economic development and poverty reduction through multi-destination and crossborder tourism (SADC and SARDC 2008). The TFCAs in the Zambezi basin are at dif...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Kavango-Zambezi TFCA Kavango-Zambezi TFCA
In December 2006, the governments of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe signed an MOU establishing the KAZA TFCA. The TFCA covers an area of 287 000 square kilometres and stretches from the Khaudum National Park in Namibia in the west to Lake Kariba in Zimbabwe in the east (SARDC 2010).Thirty-six protected areas including national parks, game reserves, community conservancies and game management areas are included in the TFCA. One of...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin navigation system Zambezi River Basin navigation system
Navigation on the Zambezi River is both international and local. The main international transport routes are the Kazungula and Luangwa-Kanyemba, while major national routes are in the upper Zambezi River and on Lake Malawi/Niassa/Nyasa. There are also small crossings that provide access to major markets (Denconsult 1998). There are major crossings on the Kabompo River, Kafue River and Chobe River in Namibia and Botswana, and on the Shire River ...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Zambezi River Basin electrical infrastructure Zambezi River Basin electrical infrastructure
The estimated hydropower potential of the Zambezi River is in the order of 20 000 MW of which only 4 684 MW has been developed (Hirji et al. 2002). About 40 possible new hydropower plants with a total installation capacity of more than 13 000 MW have been identified in the basin. About 85 per cent of this capacity is on the Zambezi River itself while the remainder is on its tributaries. Close to half the mapped potential is in Mozambique, about 2...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Map of Zimbabwe Map of Zimbabwe
Total Area of Country: 390 759 sq km Portion of Country within Zambezi Basin: 215 800 (55.2%) National Population in 2010: 13.5 million Portion of National Population within Zambezi Basin: 9 059 850 (67.11%) Zimbabwe is located between the Zambezi and Limpopo rivers, situated primarily on a high plateau that stretches across most of the country and has a subtropical climate tempered by the altitude. Savannah is the dominant ecosystem, with...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Protected area share of total land area in Zimbabwe Protected area share of total land area in Zimbabwe
The Government of Zimbabwe has maintained the size of protected areas since 1990 at 46 504 sq km, which is 12 per cent of the national surface area.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Map of Zambia Map of Zambia
Total Area of Country: 752 614 sq km Portion of Country within Zambezi Basin: 577 900 (76.8%) National Population in 2010: 13 million Portion of National Population within Zambezi Basin: 8 517 600 (65.52%) Zambia is a landlocked country resting on a high plateau with a subtropical climate characterized by a single rainy season. Savannah is the dominant ecosystem and covers the centre of the country, separating the rain forest in the northwe...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Protected ares share of total land area in Zambia Protected ares share of total land area in Zambia
Zambia has the highest proportion of protected areas to total surface area among Basin states, at 236 921 sq km, or 31 per cent.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Deforestation in Zambezi Basin Countries Deforestation in Zambezi Basin Countries
There is a growing body of evidence that the rate and extent of deforestation contribute to climate change in the Basin (SARDC and HBS 2010). The major causes of deforestation in the Basin are agricultural expansion, fuelwood collection, harvesting of non-timber forest products, commercial harvesting of natural/ indigenous timber species and forest fires. These are some of the issues that must be addressed in order to stem the destruction of for...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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