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Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups
Language not only communicates, it defines culture, nature, history, humanity, and ancestry. The indigenous languages of the Arctic have been formed and shaped in close contact with their environment. They are a valuable source of information and a wealth of knowledge on human interactions with nature is encoded in these languages. If a language is lost, a world is lost. This deep knowledge and interconnectedness is expressed in Arctic song, subs...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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States, organizations and strategical issues in the Arctic: People across borders States, organizations and strategical issues in the Arctic: People across borders
Through numerous fora, Arctic peoples now seek to define a sustainable balance in their participation between the cash economy and their traditional pursuit. Their right to influence the future of the coastal regions is under heavy pressure from industrial fisheries and exploration activities based much further south.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups
Areas show colours according to the original languages of the respective indigenous peoples, even if they do not speak their languages today. Notes: Overlapping populations are not shown. The map does not claim to show exact boundaries between the individual language groups. Typical colonial populations, which are not traditional Arctic populations, are not shown (Danes in Greenland, Russians in the Russian Federation, non-native Americans in Nor...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario)
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the future impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities. The scenario used in this map is the 'Marke...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Existing and planned development in the Mackenzie delta Existing and planned development in the Mackenzie delta
The Mackenzie delta and valley are seeing increased development of infrastructure for oil, pipelines and facilities, and with that comes temporary settlements and roads. This map illustrates the possible impacts on the environment with the suggested development in 2027.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population distribution in the circumpolar Arctic, by country (including indigenous population) Population distribution in the circumpolar Arctic, by country (including indigenous population)
The Arctic represents one of the most desolate and sparsely populated areas in the World, with few economic opporunities and inhostile climate. This map - based on the Arctic Human Development Report (AHDR) definition of the Arctic, presents the distribution by country. Note that except for Greenland and Northern Canada, indigenous peoples form a minority, though they can form the majority in local communities. They are therefore particularly vul...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002 Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the current impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090 Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) are presented in this figure, for the year 2090, with the surface temperatures over land, the size of the polar ice cap, and the outer limits of permafrost.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Population distribution in the circumpolar Arctic, by country (including indigenous population) Population distribution in the circumpolar Arctic, by country (including indigenous population)
The Arctic represents one of the most desolate and sparsely populated areas in the World, with few economic opporunities and inhostile climate. This map - based on the Arctic Human Development Report (AHDR) definition of the Arctic, presents the distribution by country. Note that except for Greenland and Northern Canada, indigenous peoples form a minority, though they can form the majority in local communities. They are therefore particularly vul...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic
Bird species that migrate to the Arctic coasts and wetlands arrive from nearly every corner of the planet. During the summer, the sun never or nearly never sets, resulting in a short but intensive breeding season when millions of migratory birds arrive in the Arctic to breed. The majority of these birds seek the wetlands and coastal shores of the tundra plains. No other place on Earth receives so many migratory species from nearly all corners of ...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Pathways of contaminants to the Arctic Pathways of contaminants to the Arctic
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants), heavy metals and other contaminants from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. This process is often referred to as long-range pollution or long-range transport of pollutants. While fear of these compounds sometimes has resulted in abandonment of traditional foods, this has also led to more unhealthy food habits acquired from non-indigenous pe...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Industrial development in the Arctic Industrial development in the Arctic
Industrial development in the Arctic. The Arctic has been opened up for increased exploration of petroleum, gas and mining activities. The Barents Sea, the Mackenzie Valley in Canada and the Alaskan North Slope, are the areas of chief interest at the moment. Please note that the shipping routes in Northern Canada are not open today for commercial shipping because of sea ice. The Northern Sea Route north of Russia is partly open today.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Satellite observations in Arctic sea ice, 1979 and 2003 Satellite observations in Arctic sea ice, 1979 and 2003
This oblique view of the Arctic polar ice cap in September shows the significant reduction that has happened over a time period just over 20 years, from 1979 to 2003. Future predicitions shows even more drastic reduction of the ice cap, thus opening new area for natural resources extraction and marine transports. Please also see an updated graphic at: http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/arctic-sea-ice-minimum-extent-in-september-1982-2005-and-2007
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Infant mortality in selected regions of the Arctic Infant mortality in selected regions of the Arctic
Infant mortality, a common health and human livelihoods indicator, is generally higher among indigenous peoples than the average populations, and can be used as a general indicator on the level of health. This graphic shows the infant mortality rate in selected regions of the Arctic and compares them to the national averages.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic protected areas and biomes Arctic protected areas and biomes
Using the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) definition of the Arctic, the majority of the current protected area (pie cheart to the left) is in the Arctic desert biome (45%), followed by the tundra biomes (29%). When looking at the total area that is currently protected in each biome, this shows that almost a third of the desert biome is protected (right figure).
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas in the Arctic Protected areas in the Arctic
Protected areas of the Arctic as recognized by the IUCN in the World Protected Areas Database at UNEP-WCMC, 2005. Some areas, like the Dehcho territory in Canada have been placed under interim protection. Information from Russia may be incomplete. Note the lack of marine protected areas, despite their ecological significance and importance to indigenous peoples.
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Economy of the Arctic, by sector Economy of the Arctic, by sector
The largest economies in the Arctic belong to Alaska (US) and Russia, mainly because of mining and petroleum activity. Regions that are still heavily dominated by more traditional subsistence activities, such as hunting and fishing, in Greenland and in Northern Canada, have much lower gross products. Similarly, reindeer herding in Russia and Scandinavia is of substantial importance to the livelihoods and lifestyles of reindeer herders like the Sa...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Definitions of the Arctic Definitions of the Arctic
Several definitions of the Arctic as a region exist and are all used extensively. Definitions of the geographic boundaries of the Arctic vary, including such definitions as the area with a July isotherm below 10º C, vegetation distribution (tundra) or political boundaries, such as the definition by CAFF (CAFF, 2001). Nowhere else on Earth do we find such vast areas of relatively undisturbed marine and coastal ecosystems.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions for selected African countries in 1997 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions for selected African countries in 1997
Africa is very vulnerable to climate change given its low capacity to respond and adapt, but Africa emits relatively low amounts of greenhouse gases in comparison to other regions. This graphic shows the amount of carbon dioxide emissions per capita, in metric tonnes, in 1997 for OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, for the world, for sub-Saharan Africa and for selected individual countries.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa Water supply and sanitation coverage in Africa
The water supply situation in Africa is already precarious, and climate change is expected to exacerbate the problem. This graphic shows the amount of water supply coverage at the national level for Africa, and the amount of sanitation coverage, as a percentage, at the national level for Africa. Statistics are shown for rural areas, for urban areas, and for all areas.
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, based on a sketch by Philippe Rekacewicz; UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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