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WWF Arctic Feedbacks ReportWWF Arctic Feedbacks Report
WWF Arctic Feedbacks Report
Thermohaline Circulation Thermohaline Circulation
If the large-scale ocean circulation is disturbed by processes altering heat and salinity in the Arctic Ocean, the consequences may be felt worldwide. The mechanism involved is the world-encompassing meridional overturning circulation (MOC).
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
3
Observed Distribution of Permafrost Types Observed Distribution of Permafrost Types
No data
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Uptake of Carbon Dioxide from the Atmosphere Uptake of Carbon Dioxide from the Atmosphere
Arctic marine systems currently provide a substantial carbon sink but the continuation of this service depends critically on arctic climate change impacts on ice, freshwater inputs, and ocean acidification.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Minimum arctic summer sea ice extent Minimum arctic summer sea ice extent
Sea ice has decreased sharply in all seasons, with summer sea ice declining most dramatically — beyond the projections of IPCC 2007.
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
4
Antarctic Greenland Antarctic Greenland
No data
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Anomalies in Northern Hemisphere Snow Cover Anomalies in Northern Hemisphere Snow Cover
Snow cover extent has continued to decline and is projected to decline further, despite the projected increase in winter snowfall in some areas.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Glacier Mass Balance Glacier Mass Balance
Glacier mass loss has been observed across the Arctic, consistent with the global trend.
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
3
Simulated Future Temperature Trends Simulated Future Temperature Trends
Weather patterns are altered.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Annual Temperatures Increases for 2001-2005 Relative to 1951-1980 Annual Temperatures Increases for 2001-2005 Relative to 1951-1980
Average surface temperature anomaly (oC)
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
2
East Siberian Arctic Shelf East Siberian Arctic Shelf
The degradation of arctic sub-sea permafrost is already releasing methane from the massive, frozen, undersea carbon pool and more is expected with further warming.
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
4
Area with near-surface permafrost (North of 45°N) Area with near-surface permafrost (North of 45°N)
Simulated a) permafrost area and active layer thickness (a) 1980- 1999 and (b) 2080-2099. (c) Observational estimates of permafrost (continuous, discontinuous, sporadic, and isolated). (d) Time series of simulated global permafrost area (excluding glacial Greenland and Antarctica).
01 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
3
Depht-corrected density of Labrador Sea water (northern North Atlantic) at 200-800 m depth Depht-corrected density of Labrador Sea water (northern North Atlantic) at 200-800 m depth
The global ocean circulation system will change under the strong influence of arctic warming.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Antarctic References Antarctic References
Images of Antarctica (left) and Greenland (right) to scale. Antarctica is 50 per cent larger than the United States or Europe. Greenland is 7 times smaller than Antarctica. There is enough ice in Antarctica to raise global sea level by 60 metres and 7 metres in Greenland.
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
3
Temperature anomalies of the intermediate Atlantic Water in Arctic Ocean Temperature anomalies of the intermediate Atlantic Water in Arctic Ocean
The Arctic Ocean connections are changing
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
4
Arctic Ocean Arctic Ocean
Left panel: Schematic of the Arctic Ocean, central basin (Canada and Eurasian basins) and arctic continental shelves (with approximate boundaries for each Arctic Ocean coastal sea), and major rivers draining into the region. Right panel: The three generic types of continental shelves (i.e., inflow, interior and outflow) are shown
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
The Arctic Ocean The Arctic Ocean
The Arctic Ocean experiences much less exchange with the atmosphere than other oceans; momentum exchange (wind drag), heat exchange and freshwater exchange are limited due to the sea ice cover.
01 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
3
Global Sea-level Rise Global Sea-level Rise
The loss of ice from the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased and will contribute substantially to global sea level rise.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Near Surface Temperature Near Surface Temperature
Summary of arctic amplification depicted from one of the climate models participating in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC 2007).
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Gas Arctic Gas Arctic
The temperature regime of sub-sea permafrost is determined by the annual temperature of the surrounding seawater, just like the thermal regime of terrestrial permafrost is determined by the arctic surface temperature.
27 Oct 2009 - by Laura Margueritte
4
Global Carbon Storage in Soils Global Carbon Storage in Soils
Arctic terrestrial ecosystems will continue to take up carbon, but warming and changes in surface hydrology will cause a far greater release of carbon.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
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