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Vital Water Graphics 2Vital Water Graphics 2
The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has been at the forefront of assessing and monitoring global water resources and presenting information on their use and management for 30 years. UNEP has compiled this report in order to provide an easily accessible resource on the state of the world's waters. The goal of this publication is to produce a clear overview, through a set of graphics, maps and other illustrations, of the state of the world's fresh and marine waters. It also illustrates the causes, effects, trends and threats facing our water sources, with examples of areas of major concern and future scenarios for the use and management of fresh, coastal and marine waters.
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/vg/water2/
Planet index 2007 for marine species population Planet index 2007 for marine species population
The Marine Species Population Index provides an assessment of the average changeover time in the populations of 217 species of marine mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The index represents the average value of six regional ocean indices. More pronounced declines are seen in the southern oceans, attributed to the fact that major losses and degradation of marine ecosystems in the industrialized world took place prior to 1970. Marine species are ...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Fish protein world consumption Fish protein world consumption
Consumption of proteins from fish in % of total consumption of animal protein.
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Coral reefs at risks Coral reefs at risks
There are two distinct regions in which coral reefs are primarily distributed: the Wider Caribbean (Atlantic Ocean) and the Indo-Pacific (from East Africa and the Red Sea to the Central Pacific Ocean). - The diversity of coral is far greater in the Indo-Pacific, particularly around Indonesia, the Philippines, and Papua New Guinea. Many other groups of marine fauna show similar patterns, with a much greater diversity in the Indo-Pacific region. ...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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The coming water scarcity in Africa The coming water scarcity in Africa
In a few years from now, almost all sub-Saharan countries will be below the level at which water supply is enough for all. Even worse, most of them will be in a state of water-stress or scarcity.
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), February 2006
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Biological oxygen demand - BOD: 1976-2008 Biological oxygen demand - BOD: 1976-2008
The availability of oxygen is one of the most important indicators of the condition of a water body, because dissolved oxygen, or DO, (the amount of oxygen dissolved in water) is necessary for most aquatic organisms, including fish and invertebrates. Some species have very defined lower limits of DO that they can tolerate. Increases in DO can indicate improvements in water quality, such as has occurred in many parts of the world in the last 30 ye...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Trends in capture fisheries and aquaculture Trends in capture fisheries and aquaculture
The levelling off of the global fisheries catch reflects a growing decline in most major fishing areas. Today, these fishing areas are producing lower yields than in the past, and it is unlikely that substantial increases will ever again be possible (FAO, 2000). Inland and marine aquaculture production grew by about 5% annually during the 1950s and 1960s, by about 8% per year during the 1970s and 1980s, and by some 10% per year during the 1990s ...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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Suspended sediment discharge Suspended sediment discharge
Asia exhibits the largest runoff volumes and, therefore, the highest levels of sediment discharge. Due to their high precipitation, the Oceanic Islands have disproportionately high-suspended sediment loads (Gleick, 1993).
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), 2008
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Renewable surface water produced internally Renewable surface water produced internally
It is difficult to determine the amount of renewable water produced internally from the total renewable water resources (external and internal). However the FAO gives a rather precise definition of this indicator. Internal Renewable Water Resources (IRWR) includes: - Average precipitation: long-term double average over space and time of the precipitation falling on the country in a year. - Surface water produced internally: long-term average an...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Impact of sea level rise in Bangladesh Impact of sea level rise in Bangladesh
Impact of sea level rise in Bangladesh. three maps in a time relapse resulting in 18 million people affected, 22,000 km2 of land submerged by flooding.
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, February 2008
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Trends in global water use by sector Trends in global water use by sector
The greyband represents in the difference between the amount of water extracted and that actually consumed. Water may be extracted, used, recycled (or returned to rivers or aquifers) and reused several times over. Consumption is final use of water, after which it can no longer be reused. That extractions have increase at a much faster rate is an indication of how much more intensively we can now exploit water. Only a fraction of water extracted i...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Main world’s river basins Main world’s river basins
Reservoirs are artificial lakes, produced by constructing physical barriers across flowing rivers, which allow the water to pool and be used for various purposes. The volume of water stored in reservoirs worldwide is estimated to be 4,286 km3 (Groombridge and Jenkins, 1998). Wetlands include swamps, bogs, marshes, mires, lagoons and floodplains. The 10 largest wetlands in the world by area are: West Siberian Lowlands (780,000-1,000,000 km2), Ama...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, February 2008
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Excessive withdrawal of renewable water resources Excessive withdrawal of renewable water resources
The countries known to be experiencing stress or scarcity of water per capita are roughly those which are excessively using their renewable water resources (North Africa, Middle-East and central Asia including Afghanistan and Pakistan). Excessive use is also of concern in some of the northern European countries such as Germany, Denmark or Poland. More so, as a consequence of damming, the Tigris and Euphrates in the eastern mountains of Turkey are...
26 Jan 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique), February 2006
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Freshwater resources: volume by continent Freshwater resources: volume by continent
Glaciers and ice caps cover about 10% of the world’s landmass. These are concentrated in Greenland and Antarctica and contain 70% of the world’s freshwater. Unfortunately, most of these resources are located far from human habitation and are not readily accessible for human use. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), 96% of the world’s frozen freshwater is at the South and North Poles, with the remaining 4% spread over 550,000 k...
01 Oct 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (Le Monde diplomatique)
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When the city harms its own water resources When the city harms its own water resources
In areas where surface water is not readily available (located far from areas of need), groundwater is the primary water source. Groundwater aquifers supply an estimated 20% of the global population living in arid and semi-arid regions. Despite their widespread presence, groundwater aquifers in arid areas receive only limited or seasonal recharge, making such aquifers susceptible to rapid depletion. The Northern Sahara Basin Aquifer, for example,...
01 Oct 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz
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The WWF living planet index for freshwater The WWF living planet index for freshwater
'The over-exploitation and mismanagement of fisheries, particularly when combined with other man-made stresses, can lead to the collapse of regional fish faunas. In many countries, aquaculture is rapidly increasing in response to declining natural fisheries, often exacerbating the degradation of inland and coastal ecosystems through habitat alteration, pollution and the introduction of alien species' (Revenga et al., 1998). The Freshwater Specie...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Damming the world Damming the world
The construction of large dams - defined as those with walls at least 15 metres high - has increased significantly over the past 50 years. The average height of new dams, estimated at 30-34 m from 1940-1990, increased to about 45 m in the 1990s, due largely to construction trends in Asia. The average area and volume of freshwater reservoirs have also steadily increased, rising to about 50 km2 between 1945 and1970, declining through the 1980s to 1...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Estimated Residence time of water resources Estimated Residence time of water resources
Estimated Residence time of water resources
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, February 2008
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Who will not reach the water and sanitation millennium development goal? Who will not reach the water and sanitation millennium development goal?
Graphic captioning the time at which Waste water will become suitable levels of consumption.
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillippe Rekacewicz, February 2006
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Transboundary water governance - averting conflict Transboundary water governance - averting conflict
Most governments recognize that violence over water is seldom strategically workable or economically viable and the most hostile enemies have a capacity for cooperation where water is concerned. The institutions that they create to avert conflict have shown extraordinary resilience. The considerable time taken to negotiate the establishment of these institutions - 40 years for the Jordan agreement for example - bears testimony to the sensitivity ...
26 Jan 2009 - by GRID-Arendal
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Industrial areas and seasonal zones of oxygen depleted waters Industrial areas and seasonal zones of oxygen depleted waters
This graphic illustrates the strong link between areas with high densities of industrial activity and zones of seasonally oxygen-depleted waters. There is a strong link between areas with high densities of industrial activity and zones of seasonal oxygen-depleted waters. In recent years there has been an increasing focus on treating and reducing municipal and industrial waste, and on reducing nitrogen levels in agricultural runoff. However, less...
26 Jan 2009 - by Phillipe Rekacewicz, (Le Monde diplomatique) February 2008
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