HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Vital Climate Graphics Latin America and the Caribbean

Collection: Vital Climate Graphics Latin America and the Caribbean

Vital Climate Graphics Latin America and the CaribbeanVital Climate Graphics Latin America and the Caribbean
Vital Climate Graphics Latin America and the Caribbean is a collection of graphics that highlight greenhouse gas emission trends, observational evidence, and projected impacts of warming and adverse weather events in the region. Despite the relatively small contribution of Latin America and the Caribbean to global warming, the fragile natural environments, livelihoods and resource-dependent economies of the region could be threatened by the impacts of global climate change. This collection of graphics is designed to present the complex subject of climate change into material that can be useful to a broad range of readers.
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/vg/lac
Sea level rise: Costa Rica coastal communities under threat Sea level rise: Costa Rica coastal communities under threat
Sea level rise is an important indicator of climate change. A rise in sea level may result in flooding, salinisation of fresh water, coastal erosion and in some cases loss of land to the ocean. As depicted, some coastal communities in Costa Rica are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Energy consumption, economic development and CO2 emissions; selected Latin America countries Energy consumption, economic development and CO2 emissions; selected Latin America countries
As a rule of thumb, economic growth is closely related to growth in energy consumption because the more energy is used, the higher the economic growth. However, it is possible to decouple energy consumption and economic growth to some extent.. More efficient use of energy may entail economic growth and a reduction in energy use. Energy efficiency may very well be an economic driving force. With an increasing use of sustainable energy sources, th...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Major N2O emitting countries in Latin America and Caribbean Major N2O emitting countries in Latin America and Caribbean
Shows the levels of N2O emissions from major Latin American and Caribbean countries and the source of the emissions. Brazil is one of the world’s largest emitters of N2O. Most of the N2O emissions in the region are generated by agriculture and a small part by the energy sector.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Dengue fever incidence; Trinidad and Tobago Dengue fever incidence; Trinidad and Tobago
Shows the increase in dengue fever as temperature rises in correlation with El Niño in Trinidad and Tobago. There is neither good prophylactic nor cure for dengue fever, a disease spread by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. There are four different strains of the disease. Infection by one of the strains does not provide immunity against the other strains. The symptoms range from a non-specific viral syndrome to fatal hemorrhagic disease. Increasing tem...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
CO2 emissions, energy use and economic development; Latin America and the Caribbean CO2 emissions, energy use and economic development; Latin America and the Caribbean
Economic growth and increased energy demand are closely linked to increased emissions of CO2. If there is a shock in the economy, the response as reduced emissions of CO2, can be almost without inertia if the shock is large. The 'oil crisis' in the early seventies-- during which energy prices rose substantially over a short period of time -- led to an almost immediate and sustained divergence of the formerly closely linked emissions and GDP in m...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
ENSO Variability index ENSO Variability index
Variability in the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index 1982-2004, and temperature variation for those years - plus or minus 3 degrees maximum in those years of the ENSO events in the Pacific Ocean and affected region.
17 May 2005 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Rapid decline of the San Quintin glacier, North Patagonia Rapid decline of the San Quintin glacier, North Patagonia
Glaciers grow and retreat at intervals depending on local climate changes, particularly variations in temperature and precipitation . Retreating and diminishing mountain glaciers all over the world, except in the Antarctica, indicate a general trend of global warming.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
CH4 emissions in 2000; Latin America and selected countries CH4 emissions in 2000; Latin America and selected countries
Since pre-industrial times, the atmospheric concentration of methane (CH4) has increased by 150%. Methane is a greenhouse gas that has a global warming potential that is 23 times stronger than CO2. (IPCC 2001) In 2000 the total world CH4 emissions was estimated at 6,000 million tonnes of CO2equivalents. In South America the emissions of CH4 per capita is almost twice the world average, while the per capita emissions in Central America and Caribb...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
CO2 emissions in 1990 and 2000 Latin America and selected countries CO2 emissions in 1990 and 2000 Latin America and selected countries
A comparison of the total level of CO2 emissions from Latin America compared to selected countries. Emissions from Latin America and Caribbean increased more than the world average between 1990 and 2000. The increase inthis region was more than 35% while the total increase in the world's emission (excluding land use change) was almost 13%. In South America the increase came mainly from industry and transport, where emissions increased by more t...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Green Continent: Latin America and the Caribbean Green Continent: Latin America and the Caribbean
Land cover distribution in classes, ratios
17 May 2005 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Sources of electricity in Latin America and the Caribbean Sources of electricity in Latin America and the Caribbean
Shows the amount of power that is used in the three main regions from fossil fuels, hydropower and other sources. While Central America and the Caribbean have a very carbon intense electricity production, even more intense than North America and Europe, South America has the lowest carbon intense electricity production . Between 1990 and 1999, emissions from electricity and heat production in fthe Caribbean and Central America increased by more...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Annual deforestation in the Amazon and resulting CO2 emissions Annual deforestation in the Amazon and resulting CO2 emissions
According to the World Resources Institute,Brazil had the highest carbon dioxide equivalent emissions in the region in 2001, primarily due to changes in land use.) Most of the region’s forests are in South America, particularly in Brazil and Peru, which comprise 92% of the total forest cover. These countries are among the 10 that hold two-thirds of the world’s forests and jungles. Because of its size, the greatest extent of deforestation is in B...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Ice thickness change vs elevation (Patagonia glaciers) Ice thickness change vs elevation (Patagonia glaciers)
Thickness, in relation to elevation, for two different ice fields located in very Southern South America (Patagonian ice fields), with 1975-2000 averages and 1995-2000 average, which show dramatic decrease.
17 May 2005 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
CO2 emissions from transportation in 2000; selected countries of Latin America and the Caribbean CO2 emissions from transportation in 2000; selected countries of Latin America and the Caribbean
A comparison of transportation CO2 emissions from selected Latin American and Caribbean countries. Increased transport is one of the main reasons for increased CO2 emissions, both in developed and developing countries. During the 1990s the increase in emissions from transport in South America was higher than the world average, while the increase in Central America and the Caribbean was similar to world average.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Rapid retreat of glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru Rapid retreat of glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru
There is now ample evidence of a major retreat of most mountain glaciers during the last 100 years in response to widespread increases in temperature. In recent decades, the rate of glacial recession has increased tremendously. Mountain glaciers supply moisture to mountain forests during thedry and warm seasons. With retreating mountain glaciers, the risk of forest fires increases, with a subsequent reduction of forested areas. Smaller glaciers...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Increase in rainfall over Buenos Aires 1900-2000 Increase in rainfall over Buenos Aires 1900-2000
There are indications of changes in precipitation patterns over Latin America and the Caribbean during the last decades. In Argentina, for example, precipitation increases have been observed over Buenos Aires over the last hundred years. This can be seen as an indication of climate change.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Trends in economy, Latin America and the Caribbean Trends in economy, Latin America and the Caribbean
In the period 1970-2002, Latin American economic development indicators were fluctuating significantly – from a decrease of 5.6 percent in 1971-1980 GDP growth to only 1.2 percent in 1981-1990, and an increase up to 3.3 percent GDP growth per year in the decade 1991-2000. The poverty that followed the collapse of the petroleum business in the 1980s was only reversed in the 1990s. During the last decade, as a result of economic reforms and private...
17 May 2005 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Change in precipitation for scenarios A2 and B2; Tropical America Change in precipitation for scenarios A2 and B2; Tropical America
When global surface temperatures increase, changes in precipitation and atmospheric moisture are very likely to increase: the hydrological cycle will be more active, and the atmosphere will increase its water holding capacity. Atmospheric water vapour is a climatically critical greenhouse gas, and more of it leads to a stronger greenhouse effect through natural feedback systems. As a rule of thumb, precipitation will increase in areas that alre...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Intense hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin Intense hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin
Global average temperature increased by 0.6 ° C over the last century, while sea levels rose by 9 to 20 cm. The IPCC projects increases in the global average surface temperature by between 1.4°C and 5.8°C and in sea level by between 9 and 88 cm. Sea level rise in combination with hurricane landfalls presents one of the greatest climate-related hazards in tropical Latin America. From 1945 to 1990 there had been an overall decrease in the number ...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Population growth Population growth
The population in Latin America and the Caribbean grew by 85 percent between 1970 and 2001, from 285 million to about 528 million. In the same time, the annual growth rates fell from 2.5 percent to 1.5 percent, which is largely due to high level of urbanization, improvements in birth control programmes and social development factors.
17 May 2005 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
      1 2 | Next