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Collection: Vital Arctic Graphics

Vital Arctic Graphics
Vital Arctic Graphics
Vital Arctic Graphics is a compilation of illustrations and case studies intended to describe the Arctic, the livelihoods of Arctic indigenous peoples and the future well-being of this region. It summarizes some of the key threats to the future sustainability of the Arctic including the rapid pace of climate change, worrying levels of persisten ...
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/vg/arctic
Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic
Bird species that migrate to the Arctic coasts and wetlands arrive from nearly every corner of the planet. During the summer, the sun never or nearly never sets, resulting in a short but intensive breeding season when mi...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Pathways of contaminants to the Arctic
Many POPs (persistent organic pollutants), heavy metals and other contaminants from emissions further south are accumulated in Arctic food chains and ultimately in indigenous peoples. This process is often referred to as...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Industrial development in the Arctic
Industrial development in the Arctic. The Arctic has been opened up for increased exploration of petroleum, gas and mining activities. The Barents Sea, the Mackenzie Valley in Canada and the Alaskan North Slope, are the ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Satellite observations in Arctic sea ice, 1979 and 2003
This oblique view of the Arctic polar ice cap in September shows the significant reduction that has happened over a time period just over 20 years, from 1979 to 2003. Future predicitions shows even more drastic reduction...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Infant mortality in selected regions of the Arctic
Infant mortality, a common health and human livelihoods indicator, is generally higher among indigenous peoples than the average populations, and can be used as a general indicator on the level of health. This graphic sh...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic protected areas and biomes
Using the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) definition of the Arctic, the majority of the current protected area (pie cheart to the left) is in the Arctic desert biome (45%), followed by the tundra biomes (29...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Protected areas in the Arctic
Protected areas of the Arctic as recognized by the IUCN in the World Protected Areas Database at UNEP-WCMC, 2005. Some areas, like the Dehcho territory in Canada have been placed under interim protection. Information fro...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Economy of the Arctic, by sector
The largest economies in the Arctic belong to Alaska (US) and Russia, mainly because of mining and petroleum activity. Regions that are still heavily dominated by more traditional subsistence activities, such as hunting ...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Definitions of the Arctic
Several definitions of the Arctic as a region exist and are all used extensively. Definitions of the geographic boundaries of the Arctic vary, including such definitions as the area with a July isotherm below 10º C, vege...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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