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The Natural Fix? - The Role of Ecosystems in Climate Mitigation
The Natural Fix? - The Role of Ecosystems in Climate Mitigation
Very large cuts in emissions of greenhouse gases are needed if we are to avoid the worst effects of global climate change. This report describes the vital contribution that ecosystems can and must make to these efforts.
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/natural-fix/
Natural ecosystem conversion
It is clear that much land needs to be kept for agricultural use but it is also possible that the area required for food production will stabilize in the future.
03 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Human use and conversion of tropical forests
Tropical forests hold the largest terrestrial carbon store and are active carbon sinks. Reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation is a vital component of tackling dangerous climate change. In addition, tack...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Historic CO2 emissions by region
Carbon cycle, carbon fluxes and stocks.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems
Terrestrial ecosystems store about 2100 Gt C in living organisms, litter and soil organic matter, which is almost three times that currently present in the atmosphere.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Temperate forests
Temperate forests are active carbon sinks and deforestation in the temperate zone has largely stopped. Where demand for land and/or water allows, reforestation would enable carbon sequestration and could provide other be...
06 Nov 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Boreal forest
The boreal forest biome holds the second largest stock of carbon; most of this is stored in the soil and litter. The draining of boreal forest peatlands, inappropriate forestry practices and poor fire management may al...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Peat distribution in the World
Peatland soils store a large amount of carbon but there is a grave risk that much of this will be lost as peatland ecosystems worldwide are being converted for agriculture, plantations and bioenergy. Conservation and res...
01 Nov 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Ocean carbon cycle
Without the contribution of oceans and coastal ecosystems to global biological carbon sequestration today’s CO2 concentration in the atmosphere would be much larger than it is. But the uptake capacity of oceans and coa...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Tundra
Tundra ecosystems are dense in carbon. They have little potential to gain more carbon but a huge amount could be lost if the permafrost were to thaw. Prevention of climate change is currently the only failsafe method o...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Carbon stored by biome
Dividing the world into seven biomes, we estimate that tropical and subtropical forests store the largest amount of carbon, almost 550 Gt.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Temperate Forests
Temperate forests are active carbon sinks and deforestation in the temperate zone has largely stopped. Where demand for land and/or water allows, reforestation would enable carbon sequestration and could provide other ...
13 Sep 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Plantation forestry
Timber forestry can be adapted to increase the amount of carbon held in plantations.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Desert and dry shrublands
The large surface area of drylands gives dryland carbon sequestration a global significance, despite their relatively low carbon density. The fact that many dryland soils have been degraded means that they are currentl...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Savannas and tropical grasslands
Savannas cover large areas of Africa and South America and can store significant amounts of carbon, especially in their soils. Activities such as cropping, heavy grazing and increased frequency or intensity of fires ca...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
World soil demand
Human needs and ecosystem conservation
01 Nov 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Carbon cycle
Living systems play a vital role in the carbon cycle. Photosynthesising organisms – mostly plants on land and various kinds of algae and bacteria in the sea – use either atmospheric carbon dioxide or that dissolved in se...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Forest, crops and the people
There are competing demands for land use. Any policy that aims to promote ecosystem carbon management must resolve conflicts between different land uses and take care not to disadvantage the poor.
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Tropical agriculture
There is great potential to restore carbon in tropical agricultural soils through management practices that, in the right circumstances, can also increase productivity. Agroforestry can offer particularly large carbon ...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The vicious cycle of depletion
Agricultural systems in the temperate zone tend to occupy fertile soils that would have formerly supported temperate grassland or forest. Land clearance for croplands and pasture has greatly reduced above ground carbo...
27 May 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Tropical forests
Tropical forests hold the largest terrestrial carbon store and are active carbon sinks. Reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation is a vital component of tackling dangerous climate change. In addition, tack...
06 Nov 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal