Graphics Library >> Protecting Arctic Biodiversity

Collection: Protecting Arctic Biodiversity

Protecting Arctic Biodiversity
Protecting Arctic Biodiversity
The Arctic region is characterized by some of the largest continuous intact ecosystems on the planet, but is facing increasingly larger threats. Protecting Arctic Biodiversity: Limitations and strengths of environmental agreements allows governing and scientific bodies of MEAs, as well as national decision-makers, to better direct their program ...
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/arctic-biodiversity
Wolverine population in the Arctic
Wolverines occur in various distinct populations across the circumpolar region, ranging from Fennoscandia and the Russian Federation, Mongolia and China, through to Alaska, Canada, and some of the northernmost states of ...
01 Nov 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Towns and industrial activities in the Arctic
The Arctic is home to approximately 4 million people, with the share of indigenous and non-indigenous populations varying widely between the Arctic states. Larger settlements are usually located in resource-strategic pos...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Red king crab native and invasive distribution
The red king crab is native to the Okhotsk and Japan Seas, the Bering Sea, and the northern Pacific Ocean, where it is an important economic resource. In Alaskan waters, red king crabs have historically been the second m...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Compensation for sheep losses in Norway
Minimizing conflicts with livestock husbandry is the most important challenge for the conservation of wolverines. In Fennoscandia, few areas exist within the wolverines’ range where there is no conflict potential with sh...
01 Nov 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Polar bear sub-populations and pollution
There are thought to be between 20,000 and 25,000 bears in the world, which occur in19 relatively discrete sub-populations, some of which are shared between nations. Topping the food chain in the Arctic, the polar bear i...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Marine mammals in the Arctic
Seven species of marine mammals live in the Arctic year-round – the bowhead whale, beluga whale, narwhal, ringed seal, beaded seal, walrus, and polar bear - and many more migrate to the Arctic seasonally. Many marine mam...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Projected changes in the Arctic climate, 2090
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) are presented in this figure, for the year 2090, with the surface temperatures over land, the size of the polar ice cap, and the outer limits o...
13 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Seal catches in the Arctic
Large-scale commercial harvests are restricted to harp and hooded seals, except for the hooded seal population in the Jan Mayen area of the Greenland Sea. Both species faced intense commercial hunting in the 19th and 20t...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Murre colonies and human activities
The thick-billed murre and common murre have ranges 1,000,000 km2 and number in the millions or tens of millions of breeding pairs. However global populations are declining, although increases have occurred in some regio...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Wild caribou (rangifer) herds and areas of reindeer husbandry
Distribution and observed trends of wild Rangifer populations throughout the circumpolar Arctic (from The Circum Arctic Rangifer Monitoring and Assessment Network, CARMA). Currently wild reindeer and caribou have decline...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The Arctic and the World - migration paths
The Arctic plays host to a vast array of biodiversity, including many globally significant populations. Included among these are more than half of the world´s shorebird species, 80% of the global goose populations, sever...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Demography of indigenous peoples of the Arctic based on linguistic groups
Language not only communicates, it defines culture, nature, history, humanity, and ancestry. The indigenous languages of the Arctic have been formed and shaped in close contact with their environment. They are a valuable...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Vegetation and land cover in the Arctic
The land mass in the Arctic - Greenland and parts of Canada, Alaska, Russia and the Nordic countries - surrounds the Arctic Ocean. In the low Arctic, down to the temperate regions, the taiga coniferous forests represents...
13 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Protected areas and World Heritage sites in the Arctic (CAFF area)
Protected areas have long been viewed as a key element for maintaining and conserving Arctic biodiversity and the functioning landscapes upon which species depend. Arctic protected areas have been established in strategi...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
The Arctic represents the northermost area of the World, the Arctic Ocean and the land areas that surrounds it. The region is characterized but cold temperatures, and ice and snow. The summers are short, but with long pe...
01 Oct 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Ratification of multilateral environmental agreements
Multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) are a main component of international environmental governance. The number of MEAs created in response to global environmental challenges has risen steadily since the UN Confe...
13 Oct 2010 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
Arctic biodiversity - pressures and impacts
The Arctic plays host to a vast array of biodiversity, including many globally significant populations. Included among these are more than half of the world´s shorebird species, 80% of the global goose populations, sever...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
The Arctic, as defined by summer temperature
The Arctic is a region not easily delineated by one boundary or definition - it includes the Arctic Ocean and the land areas around it, including Greenland, Eurasia and North America. A climate definition of the Arctic i...
01 Nov 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal