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Collection: Last Stand of the Orangutan, Rapid Response Assessment

Last Stand of the Orangutan, Rapid Response AssessmentLast Stand of the Orangutan, Rapid Response Assessment
Assessment of the current status of Orangutan (Borneo and Sumatra) with a special focus on the national park system in Indonesia. The protected areas in Indonesia are underfunded, and the current park staff are not equipped to tackle the rampant illegal logging, hunting and burning that takes places in these areas. The assessment was prepared through a collaboration with UNEP-WCMC, UNEP/GRID-Arendal together with the UNEP/UNESCO Great Apes Survival Project (GRASP).
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/orangutan/
Multinational networks and the exploitment of natural resources in developing countries Multinational networks and the exploitment of natural resources in developing countries
A generalized diagram of how multinational networks exploit and natural resources in developing countries through numerous temporary subsidiaries and the use of corruption and security firms to ensure rapid exploitation and maximum profits - but still having their hands 'clean'. Arms trading has been reported from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the bribes and 'security firms' also play a major role in Indonesia.
22 Jan 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Indonesian exports of forest products Indonesian exports of forest products
Exports of wood products from Indonesia, with final destinations such as China, Japan and North America. Almost three quarters of the wood end in destinations in Asia. In the black market, with illegal timber, the products are known to change country of origin and their labeling and classification as they are smuggled.
01 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Current and future threats from illegal logging and mining in national parks in Indonesia Current and future threats from illegal logging and mining in national parks in Indonesia
The management and enforcement of the protection regime in Indonesia is insufficient, and illegal activities - such as logging and mining, is rampant. The RAPPAM methodology, developed by WWF, has been used to assess the relative pressures and threats using questionnaires and workshops. Borneo and Sumatra are home to the Orangutan, and the protected areas represent vital habitat for the survival of the species.
01 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Routes for exports of illegally logged ramin timber in Indonesia Routes for exports of illegally logged ramin timber in Indonesia
Ramin, Gonystylus sp., is a group of tropical hardwood species in South East Asia, listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list, and the trade of the timber is regulated under CITES. Illegal logging of these species is common in Indonesia, even in protected areas. The timber is transported to sawmills in Indonesia and Malaysia and further exported to destinations in Asia, North America, Europe and elsewhere. Final market prices might amount to as hi...
22 Jan 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Extent of deforestation in Borneo 1950-2005, and projection towards 2020 Extent of deforestation in Borneo 1950-2005, and projection towards 2020
The tropical lowland and highland forests of Borneo, including vast expanses of rainforest, have decreased rapidly after the end of the second world war. Forests are burned, logged and clear, and commonly replaced with agricultural land, built-up areas or palm oil plantations. These areas represent habitat for species, such as Orangutan and elephants.
01 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Orangutan distribution on Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia) Orangutan distribution on Borneo (Indonesia, Malaysia)
The distribution of Orangutan on Borneo is rapidly decreasing, as mankind is reducing the available habitat for the apes. The loss of forest, through logging, clearing and burning, means reduced opportunities for hiding and food collection. In addition, orangutans are hunted for food and to be held in captivity.
22 Jan 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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