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In Dead Water - Climate Change, Pollution, Over-harvest, and Invasive Species in the WorldIn Dead Water - Climate Change, Pollution, Over-harvest, and Invasive Species in the World's Fishing Grounds
UNEP rapid response assessment on the state of the world's seas. In this report, the locations of the most productive fishing grounds in the World – from shallow, coastal waters to the deep and high seas- are compared to projected scenarios of climate change, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, intensity of fisheries, land-based pollution, increase of invasive species infestations and growth in coastal development.
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/in-dead-water
Primary threats to the marine environment Primary threats to the marine environment
Each of the big five stressors (not in order of magnitude), 1) Climate change; 2) Pollution (mainly coastal), 3) Fragmentation and habitat loss (from e.g. dredging/trawling, use of explosives in fishing on coral reefs etc.), 4) Invasive species infestations, and 5) Over-harvest from fisheries may individually or combined result in severe impacts on the biological production of the worlds oceans and the services they provide to billions of people ...
01 Nov 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Tropical sea temperature rises and coral reefs - climate change scenarios Tropical sea temperature rises and coral reefs - climate change scenarios
The impacts of coral reefs from rising sea temperatures. When coral reefs become heat-exposed they die, leaving the white dead coral, also known as bleaching. With even moderate pollution, the coral are easily overgrown with algae, or broken down by wave activity or storms, leaving only “coral rubble” on the ocean bed.
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Invasive species in the marine environment - problem regions Invasive species in the marine environment - problem regions
The locations of major problem areas for invasive species infestations or occurrence of exotic species in the marine environment. The impacted areas are concurrent with the areas subjected to the worst pollution, the most intensive fisheries and bottom trawling, and major shipping routes. The areas in the figure have been highlighted based on an overview of literature, and the delineation of the areas are approximate.
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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scenarios scenarios
About scenarios
29 Nov 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Tropical cyclone frequency Tropical cyclone frequency
Tropical cyclones, or hurricanes or typhoons, are storm weather systems, characterised by a low pressure centre, thunderstorms and high windspeeds. As the name testifies, these occur in the areas between the tropics, in the tropical areas. Cyclones can, after they have formed in the oceans, move in over populated areas, creating much damage and even natural disasters.
09 Oct 2007 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in fisheries and aquaculture production (2000-2005) Trends in fisheries and aquaculture production (2000-2005)
The world's marine fisheries have stagnated or slightly declined in the last decade, offset only by increases in aquaculture production. A major reason why the decline has not become more evident is likely because of advances in fishing efficiency, shift to previously discarded or avoided fish, and the fact that the fishing fleet is increasingly fishing in deeper waters
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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