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IAASTD - International assessment of agricultural science and technology for developmentIAASTD - International assessment of agricultural science and technology for development
The International Assessment of Agricultural Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD) coincides with the widespread realization that despite significant scientific and technological achievements in our ability to increase agricultural productivity, we have been less attentive to some of the unintended social and ecological consequences of our achievements. We are now in a good position to reflect on these consequences and to outline various policy options to meet the challenges ahead, perhaps best characterized as the need for food and livelihood security under increasingly constrained environmental conditions from within and outside the realm of agriculture and globalized economic systems.
Developing countries: share of agricultural exports in the world market (Hong Kong scenario) Developing countries: share of agricultural exports in the world market (Hong Kong scenario)
Agricultural trade can offer opportunities for the poor, but there are major distributional impacts among countries and within countries that in many cases have not been favorable for small-scale farmers and rural livelihoods. The poorest developing countries are net losers under most trade liberalization scenarios. 99
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Top 10 global food retailers Top 10 global food retailers
Agricultural commodities the world have seen a decline in prices accompanied by wide fluctuations over the past decades. IAASTD projections of the global food system indicate a tightening of world food markets, with increasing market concentration in a few hands and rapid growth of global retail chains in all developing countries, natural and physical resource scarcity, and adverse implications for food security.
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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