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Collection: GLOBIO assorted maps

GLOBIO assorted mapsGLOBIO assorted maps
Assorted maps that has been produced within the GLOBIO project from 2001 and on. Most of these maps have been prepared using the GEO-3 analyses and with regional and re-projected views.
Available online at: http://www.globio.info/
Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'policy first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario)
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the future impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities. The scenario used in this map is the 'Marke...
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region
The impact of infrastructure development on reindeer potentially threatens the cultural traditions of the Barents region indigenous people and their chosen way of life. The probability of impact on wildlife, vegetation and ecosystems is related to distance to different types of infrastructure. The distance zones of impact are lowest in forest and highest in open tundra. The extent of the zones are based upon several hundred field studies from int...
26 Jan 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Julien Rouaud, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Arctic development hotspots Arctic development hotspots
Projects in developing extraction of fossil fuels, such as oil and natural gas are underway in several places in the Arctic - both on land and in the sea. The fuels are to be transported by both land and sea pipelines, as well as shipped on water. The development of these activities threaten natural habitats, in hotspots for conservation and wildlife. This map displays some of the latest hotspots with current or proposed development, together wit...
01 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (markets first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'markets first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Loss of Great Ape habitat 2002-2032 (Africa) Loss of Great Ape habitat 2002-2032 (Africa)
Based on population pressures the GLOBIO2 model has assessed the current and future human impacts on Great Ape habitat in Africa (Chimpanzee, Bonobo and Gorilla). The analysis shows a vast reduction of some of the world's remaining wilderness areas. (this poster prepared for the UNESCO GRASP meeting in November 2003)
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (security first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'security first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Biodiversity loss: state and scenarios 2006 and 2050 Biodiversity loss: state and scenarios 2006 and 2050
These projections of biodiversity loss from 2000 to 2050 were produced by the GLOBIO consortium for UNEP's Global Environment Outlook 4. Across the GEO scenarios and regions, global biodiversity continues to be threatened, with strong implications for ecosystem services and human well-being. All regions continue to experience declines in terrestrial biodiversity in each of the scenarios. The greatest losses are seen in Markets First, followed by ...
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Arctic development scenarios, human impact in 2050 Arctic development scenarios, human impact in 2050
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the future impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities, using the GLOBIO model from the Global Envi...
01 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
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