HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Environment and Security: Central Asia - Ferghana/Osh/Khujand Area

Collection: Environment and Security: Central Asia - Ferghana/Os ...

Environment and Security: Central Asia - Ferghana/Osh/Khujand AreaEnvironment and Security: Central Asia - Ferghana/Osh/Khujand Area
This is part of an in-depth assessment report of the environmental and security situation in the Ferghana valley that was released on the occasion of the conference in Almaty, Kazakhstan, 27 May 2005. The report is part of a one-year process carried out in close collaboration with the three countries, has identified several clusters of issues on the environment-security interface.
Available online at: http://enrin.grida.no/security.cfm?article=10
Population distribution in the Ferghana valley Population distribution in the Ferghana valley
Given the importance of agriculture for the whole Ferghana basin, natural resources such as land and water have historically been amongst the most important factor in this regions development. The size of the population depending upon these resources is consequently a key political security, and environmental issue. The Ferghana valley is the most populous area in Central Asia. High population densities increase the risk of depletion of natural r...
16 Mar 2006 - by Dominique del Pietro and Diana Rizzolio
3
Water issues in the Ferghana Valley Water issues in the Ferghana Valley
Water is a basic production resource for agriculture. Competition for scarce water resources has been recognized as a potential source of international conflict. In the case of the Ferghana Valley, despite the very local character of the conflicts, the presence of international borders/or the implication of communities belonging to another ethnic group has loaded the conflict with a transborder and/or ethnic dimension. Earlier studies have shown ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley Industrial pollution and waste hotspots in the Ferghana Valley
Mercury mining, uranium mining, chemical and textile industries, oil facilities and processing plants which contribute to the contamination of the soil with highly toxic heavy metals are recognized as environmental challenges in the region. Even though past spills and contaminations have caused tensions between the different countries of the region, officials do not consistently regard environmental pollution by existing facilities as a security ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Previous | 1 2