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Developing states in Africa and the Pacific have sovereign rights over vast areas of the ocean filled with fish, petroleum and minerals and other resources. These countries are beginning to question the current methods of exploiting resources. Even within states with established resource industries, the benefits derived from these sectors often do not adequately support sustainable livelihoods for their citizens. Nor is much effort made to be innovative and look for ways to increase resource value while decreasing the environmental footprint caused by its exploitation. There needs to be a new conversation about how resources are extracted, and who benefits from this extraction.


While there is a strong push for the rapid development of these sectors to drive economic development, there is also an emerging need for marine and coastal ecosystems that can provide long-term sustainable benefits. In fact, responsible management does not preclude, but enables social and economic prosperity, and can spark a new era in the story of resource exploitation.  Developing nations in Africa and other regions can lead the world in the holistic approach to marine resources, an approach which acknowledges their “real” value.

Tags: Ocean Governance and Geological Resources Africa Continent GEO Governance Pacific

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